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Increasingly Frustrated with Oregon Supercharger Situation

Raleel

Member
Sep 3, 2019
81
72
Richland, wa
Agreed. My preference would be Biggs Junction, since it would serve both I-84 and Hwy 97 traffic. Hwy 97 is usually my preferred route from Seattle to Bend. Hood River will help with I-84 redundancy, at least.
mine as well. it is not much different than hood river to the dalles in distance, serves two major routes, has services. However, all of those are really truck stops, and I imagine somewhat limited in land space.
 

Tectonic

Member
Jan 27, 2020
233
431
Colorado
I think Tesla owners everywhere want more superchargers. In CA, they have high density, but lines are more common than most other places. It's getting better, but not as fast as people would like - this is largely Tesla's fault for overpromising their "coming soon" locations for years. But on the other hand, Tesla is way ahead of other EV manufacturers in having a supercharger network at all, and they seem to have turned over a new leaf of realism in their "coming soon" supercharger map.

We recently drove a leg from Poncha Springs, CO supercharger to Taos ski valley, NM - 177 miles, 2000' elevation gain, with a ski rack, temperatures around freezing, in a model 3 SR+. Yes, we had to drive slow. We had slow chargers as contingency, if needed. We made it, but it wasn't what you'd call relaxing. It would have been easier if they had built either the long "coming-soon" Alamosa or Walsenburg CO supercharger locations. I think we can all look forward to the future when superchargers are almost everywhere, like gas stations are now, but when we get there, a part of me will miss the adventure.
 

bruce4000

Member
Jul 8, 2019
157
240
Seattle
In the past Tesla only said “coming in year xxxx which meant nothing, but in January started saying which qtr implying more realistic. So Tesla map says Myrtle Creek coming in q1 2021 implies actually coming soon but no permit and no construction yet? Anyone gone through recently to check? I believe it’s the biggest gap on I5 from Mexico to Canada so should be a priority. Want to tow a small trailer but need SC every 100 miles max to be realistic.
 

PLUS EV

Running on Empty
Sep 16, 2016
6,084
9,197
Seattle
In the past Tesla only said “coming in year xxxx which meant nothing, but in January started saying which qtr implying more realistic. So Tesla map says Myrtle Creek coming in q1 2021 implies actually coming soon but no permit and no construction yet? Anyone gone through recently to check? I believe it’s the biggest gap on I5 from Mexico to Canada so should be a priority. Want to tow a small trailer but need SC every 100 miles max to be realistic.
I drove through late at night a couple weeks ago and didn't see anything. Wasn't exactly a thorough scouting though.

I'm surprised how many people seem to think that the presence of quarters is some indication that Tesla will keep their promises when they have no track record of that in the past.
 
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floatplane

Member
Aug 4, 2019
82
75
Kirkland WA
Firstly let's compare V2 (150kW max) and V3 (250kW max) superchargers. The V3 will only exceed the V2 power output for at most 15-minutes in my experience, and that's when arriving with <5% SOC. SO given that the V2's will just stay at 120-140kW for longer, you're not saving a huge amount of time. If I get out of the car for coffee or food, I never notice a V2 is slower. I just completed a trip to California where most are V2 chargers and really didn't feel the need for V3 power. I also didn't have to share a V2 unit anywhere, except once, so that helped.

As a Seattle area driver, I'd like to give you a perspective from up here. There have been a lot of superchargers turned on in Washington State in the last 18 months, and I'm grateful for options, but I don't use them because they are TOO CLOSE to home on any outbound trip when I leave home with 100% SOC. My first stops outbound are Salem going south on I-5 (used to be Woodburn until this year) and Moses Lake going east on I-90. I probably could make Ritzville instead, but since the mountains of ID/MT are energy suckers, I will always charge to near full at Spokane or Coeur d'Alene before traversing them thar hills, so don't need to stretch my range on the prairie portion of WA.

Returning home when I haven't been able to get an overnight L2 charge somewhere, I don't want to supercharge to 100%, so will make use of the new Washington state chargers so I can go a little faster on my way home. But as they say, with EVs go slow to get there faster.

For Oregon travels, I can make Woodburn to Bandon without a sweat, so feel reaching any part of the Oregon coast is OK, but there's a big gap between Bandon and Lincoln City. The "coming soon" site in Newport would help, but I feel it should be further south, in either Florence or Reedsport, as both those cities have routes inland to I-5.

My travels in Eastern Oregon have been limited to Bend area (which obviously is covered), and an eclipse trip to Monument. I welcome Burns being permitted (not yet started construction) but feel something is needed north of that in John Day area to cover OR-26, but most of all something closer to Nevada on Rte 95, say in McDermitt to make a trip from Seattle to Vegas without having to go via Salt Lake City. That trip was Covidized last March and never happened.
 
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Raleel

Member
Sep 3, 2019
81
72
Richland, wa
Firstly let's compare V2 (150kW max) and V3 (250kW max) superchargers. The V3 will only exceed the V2 power output for at most 15-minutes in my experience, and that's when arriving with <5% SOC. SO given that the V2's will just stay at 120-140kW for longer, you're not saving a huge amount of time. If I get out of the car for coffee or food, I never notice a V2 is slower. I just completed a trip to California where most are V2 chargers and really didn't feel the need for V3 power. I also didn't have to share a V2 unit anywhere, except once, so that helped.
Agreed. While nice, I tend to do my stops with meals and schedule longer breaks. the gain is marginal for me.
they are TOO CLOSE to home on any outbound trip
Agreed. I leave with that much most of the time. I do use Cle Elum, though, because it's far away for me when I go to Seattle :)
Bend area (which obviously is covered)
yes, Bend itself is good. Coming from the north on the eastern side, The Dalles is 20 minutes out of the way and going without it adds a lot of time at 50mph.

I can hope they get their stuff together and put one in. Hood River is great and all, but I fail to see how it's advantageous for many folks. It's near portland, near the dalles, and not on a north-south like Biggs Junction. Great spot to eat though!
 

Moorebid

Member
Aug 19, 2017
39
89
Portland, OR
Great spot to eat though!
This! It'd be nice if we could move away from, "How does this facilitate my travel from point A to point Z?", and more toward, "How does this facilitate my consumption of great (and unique) food?" :p I'm much more likely to patronize the area around Superchargers with good food options than I am a "gas station" in the middle of nowhere.

But there I go again — begging to be choosy. :cool:
 

Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
6,127
7,133
Boise, ID
Hwy 95 from Winnemucca NV through eastern Oregon to Boise remains the largest gap in Oregon.
Huh. Those are now closer than I thought now that they built the one in Ontario, OR. That route to Bend used to be over 300 miles. From Supercharger to Supercharger, Ontario to Bend is now 262 miles. Boise to Winnemucca is 255 miles.
 
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Mrbrock

Member
Mar 26, 2020
698
385
Napa, CA
I've been a happy Tesla owner for almost 2 years now, and we're considering a Model Y but we have our reservations that come down to traveling safely (and conveniently). I feel like we're being underserved with Superchargers for long-distance travel here in Oregon.

While the northwest area of the state is well covered, traveling east/west on I-84 and south on I-5 (south of Springfield) is not convenient and quite frankly not safe. There are multiple single-points of failure.

Specifically, traveling east/west on I-84 would be a non-starter with my family, with over 130 miles between superchargers (The Dalles and Pendleton, which are the old 150kW models) and literally nothing in-between. I would not feel comfortable traveling with my family in a Tesla along this route, which makes us hesitant to get a second Tesla and go all-electric.

Traveling south is equally inconvenient. There's nearly 140 miles between Springfield and Grants Pass (again, both are the old 150kW models). I understand there are planned Superchargers between this gap, but this has been the case for over 3 years with nothing to show for it.

I feel like we're on a bit of an island here in NW Oregon. I'm frustrated, and at this point, I'm leaning towards keeping our gas car as our main vehicle for traveling. Does anyone here share my frustrations? Is there any way to voice this to the Tesla Supercharger team?
How often do you make these road trips and how long are they? Sometimes it makes more sense to rent a minivan for travels with the troupe and enjoy the savings and everyday fun of Tesla’s for your normal driving until you are more comfortable with the supercharger situation.

This is set at departure 100% soc in a SR Y set to 325 wh/mile consumption And just picking a random E OR destination. There is one stretch recommended for 55mph max but this would be worst case. If you go long range you should have no issues unless we are talking major snow/rain/wind. In that case, maybe you plan to overnight in the middle of the Dalles/Pendleton gap somewhere with L2 overnight charging. Just some thoughts, may not make sense for you but maybe something you haven’t thought of.

1617625956289.png
 

IdaX

Member
Dec 27, 2016
428
522
Moscow, Idaho
The Y gets much worse efficiency compared to the 3.
You're right; I was thinking 3 for some reason. Still, that reference Wh/mi is that of an X... would have to be a pretty bad day for a Y to get that bad as a reference consumption. But I suppose that's the point of your post!
 

Raleel

Member
Sep 3, 2019
81
72
Richland, wa
yea, 325 is high, but I've seen it in a 3 going into a headwind down the gorge, from Umatilla to The Dalles, pretty much the whole way. Very tough at that point.
 

Mrbrock

Member
Mar 26, 2020
698
385
Napa, CA
Is the Model 3 SR pulling a trailer or something; that's terrible consumption! :)
I purposely entered a high wh/mile to show worst case scenario (I think ABRP default is 293 for SR Y). Think rain, cold, wind or other negative range factors. Just trying to show OP that while range anxiety can be real, even with the lowest range current vehicle (Y SR) it isn’t that bad of a situation. One only made better by adding 80 (60 real world) extra miles by getting LR Y.
 

theeskimo

Member
Sep 26, 2019
61
64
Vancouver Washington
Real world example of when I drove from my home in Vancouver to the Pendleton supercharger in my 2019 Stealth with 18 inch Aeros and hubcaps on. The route goes through the Columbia River Gorge which very often has high winds. It's doable in a LR Model 3, especially the 2021 models, just watch your speed :)

Screen Shot 2021-04-12 at 9.47.14 AM.png
 
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Raleel

Member
Sep 3, 2019
81
72
Richland, wa
Real world example of when I drove from my home in Vancouver to the Pendleton supercharger in my 2019 Stealth with 18 inch Aeros and hubcaps on. The route goes through the Columbia River Gorge which very often has high winds. It's doable in a LR Model 3, especially the 2021 models, just watch your speed :)

View attachment 653191
yea, doable, though that direction is with the wind much of the time. it's tough. one of the reasons to want a 2021 LR
 
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acarney

Active Member
Jul 9, 2019
2,441
1,506
Richland, WA
Real world example of when I drove from my home in Vancouver to the Pendleton supercharger in my 2019 Stealth with 18 inch Aeros and hubcaps on. The route goes through the Columbia River Gorge which very often has high winds. It's doable in a LR Model 3, especially the 2021 models, just watch your speed :)

View attachment 653191

Try doing it in an SR+ or a Model X towing something...

Also, Teslafi doesn't log energy usage, it's an estimate based on distance traveled and best guesses of efficiency. You can actually go in and update the ratio factor that it uses. ABRP or another service would be a bit more accurate, especially in changing conditions like wind or rain.
 

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