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Model 3- Supercharger free or Supercharger capable?

Discussion in 'Australia & New Zealand' started by Blue heaven, Apr 2, 2016.

  1. Blue heaven

    Blue heaven Member

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    the word free was never mentioned as far as I understand, a lot of people assumed that's the course Tesla are taking.
     
  2. Seesaw

    Seesaw Member

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    #2 Seesaw, Apr 2, 2016
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2016
    The more I read about it, the more I think it will be free.

    For long distance trips I doubt most Tesla owners use more than $50 a year in electricity, not worth the PR blow and cost of billing system to implement. Elon has been very big in promoting EVs as a paradigm shift in mass transport - and simply having free long distance access greatly improves their messaging.

    They may have a problem with people over using Superchargers for urban use, but I think they should handle that as a seperate problem.
     
  3. ZTrekus

    ZTrekus Member

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    There is another factor to consider here.

    Tesla has a monopoly in the electric car field because of its supercharger network. A couple of CEOs of major auto companies have said that (not my opinion). That monopoly came at a major capital expense (not to mention administrative nightmares organising land leases all across the world).

    Anyway - the moment Tesla starts to charge for the supercharger network - then they effectively lose their monopoly - because there would be no good reason to not charge every single electric car with the proper adapter. BUT whilst they offer it free to Teslas - no one can seriously suggest that they should also offer it free to other cars - AND equally they cannot suggest that Tesla should put something in place (that would no doubt be said to cost millions) to charge other cars and not Teslas.

    The proper-gander war will not allow Tesla to charge their supercharger network to Teslas and no other car simply to maintain a monopoly. Such a move would be seen as anti-competitive, profiteering, and contrary to Tesla's claimed principles of trying to help the environment (which factored very heavily in the opening speech of Elon on the Model 3 unveiling I might add). Now, for example, China has demanded that the Supercharger network be allowed for all Chinese EVs and Elon Musk has expressly consented to that course of action. Red China hates capitalism/monopolies and Elon Musk needs China for the Tesla vision - so business decisions follow.

    Lastly, it cannot be overstated just how valuable the supercharger monopoly is to Tesla. Take the arse-end* of the world for example (*Paul Keeting's words - not mine). Why would you buy a Volt or Audi EV, or Merc EV or Aston Martin EV (when they come out of course) if you are seriously contemplating ever driving from one capital city to another? They would require serious time wasted in charging the car after 250kms. Either you camp out overnight and more to charge from 10 amps or you spend serious time and inconvenience mapping out Charger networks for a most unsatisfactory band-aid solution. But Tesla RIGHT HERE AND NOW allow you to drive from one capital city to another ABSOLUTELY FREE! Even better than an ICE car! (I mean they will have covered that by the time the Model 3 hits our shores, surely).

    You see what a terrific marketing advantage Tesla has by keeping the supercharger free* (*And of course, what does free mean anyway? An extra 2k hidden charge on the base model would not really be noticed).

    So I am betting that Elon Musk will keep the supercharger network free in the short term as sure as I am that Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump will be the next President of the free-world... (Moderators please note: That last comment is not supposed to invite political comment!! - just trying to make a dry subject a little funny.)
     
  4. Az_Rael

    Az_Rael Active Member

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    Based on Teslas PR comments since the event, they are keeping their options open to charge for supercharger access/use. We probably won't know anything more solid until the Level 2 announcement for the 3, which won't be until 2017 I would imagine.
     
  5. paulp

    paulp Member

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    Although I currently charge using solar, if I was to use a supercharger exclusively and at SA rates the annual cost would be around $2500 PER YEAR. Surely tesla cant afford to be paying that for each of say 1 million owners of model 3 in a decades time? Otherwise its a bit like a pyramid scheme, the next sale pays for the last one until it all gets out of control and collapses.
    But if it is free, 1 million cars in aus in 10 years will be substantially lower than reality.
     
  6. Mark E

    Mark E Member

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    That seems like a really high number. I drove just under 20,000km last year and averaged less than 200Wh/km. That's 4000kWh for the years total driving. I was paying 11-12c/kWh off peak rates- so $440-500 tops to run the car exclusively.
     
  7. PJF000

    PJF000 TOCA Member

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    Tesla would not be paying retail prices for the electricity.
     
  8. paulp

    paulp Member

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    Try living in SA, where if you have just one solar panel you cannot have off-peak, and pay 33-38c /kwh.
     
  9. paulp

    paulp Member

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    I can only comment on the SA electricity market, but as a purchaser of a considerable amount of commercial power, I can assure you that the rates are not a lot less than a decent discounted residential rate. I guess other markets are different, which would make for a different equation. You then have the hideous cost in SA of getting a commercial connection for a large capacity supply. CBD for example is unlikely to be less than $250k, and with a minimum annual purchase requirement.
     
  10. raynewman

    raynewman Member

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    I am paying 15 cents per kWh residential (special for the car) which equated to approx $90 per month and I've done 30,000 km in a year.
    Unfortunately, living in a unit, I really don't have the solar option. So, in Brisbane, $1080 PA is the cost.
     
  11. Blue heaven

    Blue heaven Member

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    If Tesla purchase electricity at 20 cents a unit ( could be considerably less than that) it would equate to $600 per driver covering an average of 15 000km per year, that does tally up over the lifetime of a car but I would think Tesla are using the lifetime gym membership system, some will use it religiously but for most it will be a few times a year.
    The issue will be the amount of drivers who treat free as let's abuse the system ( like parents brawling at a kids Easter egg hunt ), Tesla have already had small pockets of this problem with locals consistently using superchargers when they have a HPWC at home, causing delays at superchargers for drivers travelling long distance, Tesla supercharger rollout will double in 30 months but it's car fleet is likely to triple before the model 3 even hits the streets, hopefully a bit of respect for fellow Tesla owners is shown.
     
  12. lolachampcar

    lolachampcar Active Member

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    Given Tesla's past, the lowest end model will have SC as an option if only to get the price point way down. You can then opt in via an upgrade fee (likely $500 over the initial option cost). The number will be such that, on average, it covers the cost of electricity and ongoing maintenance with the initial capital expense being written off to marketing.

    It has made sense up until now so why not continue the trend. Also, your competition is not offering SCing on their offerings so you are at no disadvantage when people are price shopping against the Bolt and such.
     

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