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Model Y review from an mechanical and software engineer's standpoint.

Some cars, like mine, are inflicted with heavy duty phantom braking, as in full pressure for no reason or warning. Its a useless extremely unsafe system. Its worth noting that tesla now acknowledge this problem in the manual, and make the manual available before you buy.
Yea got to a point now where I turn off some of the "safety" features to limit them to a minimum. They reset after each drive is a inconvenience I will put up with for just to be able to use a cruise control I paid for LOL.
 
I'm with you about too much dependance on the touch screen when more physical buttons would be better. Yes, it's very hard to touch in an exact small spot on a large screen while driving a moving car.
Learnt to rest my fingers on the bezel of the screen to allow my thumb to hit those small icons. :rolleyes:😁
 
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Ok,, looking up the steering rack ratios of model 3 and Y, they are the same, of 10.3:1 which is lower than any car, performance or otherwise, I have driven. Closest was a BMW M3 at 12:1 from memory. Even Porsche, Lambos. Ferrari, do not even get that close from what I can see.

Not sure why Tesla are trying to reinvent something that what I consider are great handling cars from other manufacturers that have worked out, ie steering rack ratios, over decades of autobahns use and or even racing.
 
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Ok,, looking up the steering rack ratios of model 3 and Y, they are the same, of 10.3:1 which is lower than any car, performance or otherwise, I have driven. Closest was a BMW M3 at 12:1 from memory. Even Porsche, Lambos. Ferrari, do not even get that close from what I can see.

Not sure why Tesla are trying to reinvent something that what I consider are great handling cars from other manufacturers that have worked out, ie steering rack ratios, over decades of autobahns use and or even racing.
To compensate for a large turning circle?
 
To compensate for a large turning circle?
Not sure.

Might be Tesla considering it makes it a more sporty or manoeuvrable feel. At "around town" speeds I think that's probably ok.

At higher speeds is where I consider the steering rack ratio is too low to make it one of the good handling cars especially for the inexperienced or even average driver IMO.
 
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I think it might also be something along the lines of when the cars were designed they know they wanted "Automatic Steering" so they found a ratio that suited the automatic steering ad the human pilots as well. Most cars are 99% human drivers with the automatic stuff only taking over very accasionally
 
Ok,, looking up the steering rack ratios of model 3 and Y, they are the same, of 10.3:1 which is lower than any car, performance or otherwise, I have driven. Closest was a BMW M3 at 12:1 from memory. Even Porsche, Lambos. Ferrari, do not even get that close from what I can see.

Not sure why Tesla are trying to reinvent something that what I consider are great handling cars from other manufacturers that have worked out, ie steering rack ratios, over decades of autobahns use and or even racing.
My car is never going to be on the autobahn or indeed a race track.
 
I'm with you about too much dependance on the touch screen when more physical buttons would be better. Yes, it's very hard to touch in an exact small spot on a large screen while driving a moving car.
I agree. It's the biggest downfall of the current design... it's so hard to use when on the move. Especially without taking eyes off the road.
 
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My car is never going to be on the autobahn or indeed a race track.

I was born in the country and learnt to drive in the country on dirt tracks, salt pans, and roo infested roads. I havn’t killed myself yet obviously.
Ok, now I feel sorry for you. Born in the country, living in the city. Remember though, good country road driving skills can be lost over time unless regularly updated through actual regular driver training IMHO.
 
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"77 per cent of fatalities on country roads were country residents, who make up only 39 per cent of the NSW population"

from "https://roadsafety.transport.nsw.gov.au/downloads/road-safety-progress-report-2021.pdf"
From my experience fatalities on country roads happen in this order:

1. Young inexperienced local drivers, mostly men, out of their depth in usually driving too fast.
2. City drivers that have moved to the country.
3. City drivers on holiday or "travelling through the area".
4. Very occasionally experienced country road driver.

But that's just my experience.
 
I agree. It's the biggest downfall of the current design... it's so hard to use when on the move. Especially without taking eyes off the road.
Yes I agree. Had a experience last weekend where I was letting my youngest son drive the Model Y, on the freeway, when the wipers started with no visible moisture on the windscreen. Thought maybe a bug had splattered in front of the camera so I asked my son to hit the washers on the stalk and just concentrate on driving while I trouble shoot the problem on the screen. The wipers would not stop, and I could not get them to stop manually, until I asked my son to take the car out of adaptive cruise control.

Seems to be a problem I have never experienced with other car manufacturer's auto-wipers feature, that certainly could be a safety distraction IMO.
 
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Is that like saying, "90% (made up stat) of fatalities on Australian roads were Australian residents, who make up less than 1% of the world's population?"
LOL. Yea it's like that IMO. Majority of the people killed on country roads were the people that used those country roads for the majority of the time. But the amount of them that use those country roads regularly are less than those that that live in the city that don't.

Just WOW.
 
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