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Putting some numbers on the factors that affect range

Discussion in 'Model S: Battery & Charging' started by ChadS, Jan 27, 2013.

  1. Ulmo

    Ulmo Active Member

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    #121 Ulmo, Feb 28, 2017
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2017
    In my Model S 60D (software limited 75) with my heating and driving habits and usual terrain, I get "slightly better than one mile per percent". That's about 80% of the "realistic" figure you quoted above.

    I want to remember to come and look at this thread and similar threads next time I prepare for a long journey, to experiment with optimum driving speeds.
     
  2. ChadS

    ChadS Petroleum is for sissies

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    Hi Ulmo. Do I understand you to say that you average just over 100 miles of range per full charge, or about 50% of EPA?

    Of course that's possible; Car and Driver took a Prius around a test track and got 18mpg out of a 48mpg-rated car. It just is not common; in fact in over 150k of driving I have never seen a single trip anywhere near that bad. (Our long-term average is about 10% under EPA). It would be interesting to learn more about your typical driving conditions if you are willing to share.

    Perhaps you take really short trips in cold weather, so the initial battery/cabin warming is having an oversized effect on the numbers. I don't even check the numbers on really short trips for that reason (well, that plus the fact that with a really short trip I am not worried about range), so it's entirely possible I have taken a short 50%-of-EPA trip, even though I don't average anywhere near that.
     
  3. majcina

    majcina Member

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    I'm guessing @Ulmo drives uphill both ways in snow. ;)
     
  4. MocosMan

    MocosMan Member

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    Tire wear may be even - but surface area of contact with the road is lowered. i.e. overinflation can cause accidents - be careful here.
     
    • Informative x 1
  5. AWDtsla

    AWDtsla Active Member

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    Treating the tires like an infinite traction machine causes accidents. You should be able to successfully drive despite varying surface friction.
     
  6. FlyF4

    FlyF4 Member

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    Gee, really informative post. Thanks for the good sleep (falling asleep as I consumed the data) :D
    I was a little confused at first when looking at the numerical plus and minus numbers. Wasn't sure if you were talking about + mileage or + more energy used. But wasn't hard to understand when thinking about it.
     
  7. jerry33

    jerry33 S85 - VIN:P05130 - 3/2/13

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    Note that the more slippery surface conditions are often helped by increased pressure. Lower pressure gets you better traction on high friction surfaces--where it's least needed.
     
  8. FlyF4

    FlyF4 Member

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    "Note that the more slippery surface conditions are often helped by increased pressure."
    Really? I never thought about it until now, but it seems that it would be the opposite... lower pressure = more tire touching the road = better traction?
     
  9. MocosMan

    MocosMan Member

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    What FlyF4 said
     
  10. AWDtsla

    AWDtsla Active Member

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    Depends on the surface. Some work better with lower area, meaning more pressure. Rally races prefer thinner tires, for example. In general the wider a snow tire, the worse it is.
     
    • Helpful x 1
  11. FlatSix911

    FlatSix911 918 Hybrid

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    Keep in mind that proper inflation will maximize tire grip :cool:

    upload_2017-4-4_19-16-13.png
     
    • Helpful x 3
  12. Ulmo

    Ulmo Active Member

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    #132 Ulmo, Apr 4, 2017
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2017
    In Winter, I did for some trips. Longer was worse due to soaking footwell with cold air. TeslaFi:

    IMG_6259.jpg IMG_6260.jpg

    Only 3 times. Almost 100 times in rain. Uphill both ways? Of course! And back down again! Just the regular stuff: 17, 152, 580, Grapevine, Sierra Nevadas, etc. Just got back from Tahoe (got some beautiful pictures). Just came again to Central Valley.

    I think most of it is just winter temperature taking more energy, and a bit of the old wanting to stay awake and not die of boredom adding air resistance and acceleration. The mountains do add another angle to it.

    I keep thinking I've gotten better at handling my range distance, but I think a large part of that is illusory, because it's getting warmer and it just goes further in summer.
     
    • Like x 1
  13. AWDtsla

    AWDtsla Active Member

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    Radial tires don't really do really that, thanks to the radial steel belts. Except for extreme underinflation.
     

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