Welcome to Tesla Motors Club
Discuss Tesla's Model S, Model 3, Model X, Model Y, Cybertruck, Roadster and More.
Register

Service says $22k for new battery on 2012 Model S

raphy3

Member
May 5, 2017
430
922
Elsewhere
I think those resale values are too optimistic. We probably shouldn't assume that all 8 year old cars will need a battery replaced before year 12, either. That kind of sounds disasterous.
 

Rusty1

Member
Sep 13, 2017
141
141
Ooltewah, TN
I think those resale values are too optimistic. We probably shouldn't assume that all 8 year old cars will need a battery replaced before year 12, either. That kind of sounds disasterous.
You can move the numbers around some, but the comparison stands. All Model S batteries won’t have to be replaced, but you have to plan for that case.
 

rns-e

Member
May 5, 2013
511
237
Denmark
I guess at end of day battery capacity number shouldn't matter for customer. If customer likes range then pay the asking price and be done with it.
So it is your claim that the stated range is the most accurate number people can use to make their decision? Have you read the trillion threads about how people can not get the range they were promised?

'Pay the asking price and be done with it' - range as a factual number is worse than selling elastic bands by the meter.

As the great Daddy McEnroe once yelled - 'You cannot be serious'
 

raphy3

Member
May 5, 2017
430
922
Elsewhere
You can move the numbers around some, but the comparison stands. All Model S batteries won’t have to be replaced, but you have to plan for that case.
no, I don't think the comparison still stands. For one thing, resale is going to be in the low 20s pretty soon. Your analysis is way too simple to be useful.
 
  • Disagree
Reactions: Rusty1

STE$LAR

Banned
Jun 8, 2021
115
48
ORANGE COUNTY CALIFORNIA
I am currently doing an out-of-warranty replacement for a failed battery on a 2013 Model S. We chose to go with Tesla because third party repairs involve long-distance shipping and are not warrantied. We are the original owners, 66,000 miles on the this original battery.

I received written service estimates for both a NEW 90kwh battery ($22K) and a REMAN 85kwh battery ($10,500). The NEW battery offer was revoked by our SC after the service appointment was made. Stated reasons were "the service advisor you spoke with in-person made a mistake", "we never put new batteries in existing cars" and "the remanufactured battery is what was approved for your car by upper management".

I have not been able to get a clear answer on what warranty the REMAN battery will carry, as Tesla's limited parts warranty (Vehicle Warranty) does not clearly state. Will be seeking written clarification when we pick the car up and will report back here.
4 years 50k miles
 

Rusty1

Member
Sep 13, 2017
141
141
Ooltewah, TN
This battery cost just goes along with my calculations of electric cars are more expensive to own than ICE cars. I have never been able to make the finances work for a new or used electric. Maybe the Model 3 can do it if the battery and motor last +300K miles. I just sold my Model S because of these costs. The new owner just replaced the motor and a cooling pump. The car is on its fourth motor and second battery (2012 Model S with 130.000 miles). The motor and a cooling pump cost $8,800 dollars to replace out of warranty.

My experience with the Model S has cost me $7-8K/year. I could have bought a new Toyota and spent less than $5K/year.

BTW- I loved my Model S and would do it again, but the experience cost me more than an ICE would have cost.
 
Last edited:
  • Informative
  • Like
Reactions: dipper and Matias

Rusty1

Member
Sep 13, 2017
141
141
Ooltewah, TN
no, I don't think the comparison still stands. For one thing, resale is going to be in the low 20s pretty soon. Your analysis is way too simple to be useful.
We can agree to disagree. The Model S is an expensive car whether new or used. It will cost a lot to keep it on the road. If you get lucky, you won’t spend more than a new car costs.
 
  • Like
Reactions: navguy12

FlatSix911

Porsche 918 Hybrid
Jun 15, 2015
7,041
7,052
Silicon Valley
This battery cost just goes along with my calculations of electric cars are more expensive to own than ICE cars. I have never been able to make the finances work for a new or used electric. Maybe the Model 3 can do it if the battery and motor last +300K miles. I just sold my Model S because of these costs. The new owner just replaced the motor and a cooling pump. The car is on its fourth motor and second battery (2012 Model S with 130.000 miles). The motor and a cooling pump cost $8,800 dollars to replace out of warranty.

My experience with the Model S has cost me $7-8K/year. I could have bought a new Toyota and spent less than $5K/year.

BTW- I loved my Model S and would do it again, but the experience cost me more than an ICE would have cost.
Apples vs Oranges... your 2012 Model S was the first production year and experienced significantly more issues than subsequent years. YMMV.
 

DLM270

#7773
Jun 8, 2012
192
23
Fremont, CA
I got my Model S VIN 1751 off the line back in 2012 and have had it ever since. On Feb 14th during the day, I pulled it out of the garage with 114 miles showing on the battery. I woke up in the morning with some battery low errors. When I got into the car, it told me that the car wouldn't drive because it needed service, the 12V battery was low voltage and the HV battery was at 0 miles. After calling Tesla Roadside Assistance, they connected to the car and said that it had to be towed to a service center. I was able to get it towed to the closes Tesla service center and now they the tell me my warranty for the drivetrain expired on 1/9/21 (one month earlier) and the HV battery has to be replace for $22k. If my battery was 8 years old, I would be ok with that. I assumed a level of risk having a car for this long and I expected that the battery would go bad at some point. It's just a shame that it died a month after the warranty expired. The kicker for me is that I had a faulty backflow prevention valve in my HV battery 1.5 years ago and had the battery replaced under warranty. Now service is telling me that if I buy a new battery for $22k I get a 4 year/50k mile warranty on the new battery, but the battery they replaced 1.5 years ago only had a one year warranty for parts. I feel I had to somewhat document this to people as I am one of the first roughly 2k-2.5k cars that are out of warranty at this point and I seem to be one of the first to at least document out of warranty replacement options on this site (at least as my search abilities go). So be careful when that warranty expires. You are on your own. Tesla isn't budging on helping my 1.5 year old bad battery and now essentially bricked car. From what I can tell, the car is worth somewhere between $18k-25k working. I'm not sure yet if I'm going forward with the battery replacement to sell it or not.
If you have the battery replaced in a 2013 or 2014 Model S, will you be able to benefit from the faster charging of the newer Tesla Charge Stations?
 

gaswalla

Model S,3,X.. CT with Austin delivery
Sep 23, 2012
3,550
4,190
San Diego
yes.. I get supercharger rates up to 125kw on my 2012 with the "new battery that they don't install in old cars" (per the service manager a few posts above)
My understanding is that rates above that are limited by the car's wiring/fuse limitations... so no 250kw charging
 
  • Like
Reactions: FlatSix911

rameshratan

Member
Aug 6, 2021
55
134
Houston
It seems we've gotten off track of the OP's point, that Tesla wants $22k for a replacement battery while the cost of batteries is dropping. The advice to seek out Rich Rebuilds is good, and hopefully other independent companies will fill this likely expanding market as more of us are in OP's shoes.
I like your response. We need more alternate battery suppliers as the original Teslas are reaching the end of battery life.
 
May 13, 2015
19
5
yes.. I get supercharger rates up to 125kw on my 2012 with the "new battery that they don't install in old cars" (per the service manager a few posts above)
My understanding is that rates above that are limited by the car's wiring/fuse limitations... so no 250kw charging
So getting a battery replacement from tesla allowed you to take advantage of the 125KW charging on your 2012? I assume you still have unlimited supercharging right?
 
  • Like
Reactions: gaswalla

sorka

Well-Known Member
Feb 28, 2015
8,318
6,271
Merced, CA
The maximum possible charge rate in KW is not dependent on having unlimited supercharging or paying for each charge.
It only depends on the type of battery and the condition of the battery,


...and the software you have. I went from SOC + KW = 130 to 110 with a single software update when I got the MCU2 upgrade and had to leave my beloved v8 and get v10.

This graph shows my charging rate just days before and days after. I have hundreds of charge sessions all showing the same 130 combined rate before the upgrade and dozens now after the upgrade all showing the 110 combined rate.

i-52jrN5q-X3.png
 
  • Informative
Reactions: Krash and jpvdheijn

Products we're discussing on TMC...

About Us

Formed in 2006, Tesla Motors Club (TMC) was the first independent online Tesla community. Today it remains the largest and most dynamic community of Tesla enthusiasts. Learn more.

Do you value your experience at TMC? Consider becoming a Supporting Member of Tesla Motors Club. As a thank you for your contribution, you'll get nearly no ads in the Community and Groups sections. Additional perks are available depending on the level of contribution. Please visit the Account Upgrades page for more details.


SUPPORT TMC
Top