Welcome to Tesla Motors Club
Discuss Tesla's Model S, Model 3, Model X, Model Y, Cybertruck, Roadster and More.
Register
  • Want to remove ads? Register an account and login to see fewer ads, and become a Supporting Member to remove almost all ads.
  • The final cut of TMC Podcast #27 is available now with topics time-stamped. We discussed: Consolidation in LiDAR manufacturers; Volvo EX90 shipping with LiDAR; FSD Beta Full Release in N.A.; FSD detecting autopilot cheats, Gwen Shotwell directly overseeing SpaceX Starship; and more. You can watch it now on YouTube. We should have it published to podcast networks shortly.

Doug_G

Lead Moderator
Global Moderator
Apr 2, 2010
17,888
3,414
Ottawa, Canada
Word of warning for those in cold climes - make sure your snow brush has very soft bristles. After cleaning all the salt off my car I've noticed a bunch of faint scratches in odd places. Scratched my head for a bit before realizing the brush I use to remove snow from the car must be responsible. :cursing:

I've never had this problem before. The brush is pretty old, but I was using it on my Infiniti previously with no issues. I guess the Model S paint is a bit soft.

Now shopping for a new brush...
 

mknox

Well-Known Member
Aug 7, 2012
10,104
1,900
Toronto, ON
Word of warning for those in cold climes - make sure your snow brush has very soft bristles. After cleaning all the salt off my car I've noticed a bunch of faint scratches in odd places. Scratched my head for a bit before realizing the brush I use to remove snow from the car must be responsible. :cursing:

I've never had this problem before. The brush is pretty old, but I was using it on my Infiniti previously with no issues. I guess the Model S paint is a bit soft.

Thanks for the heads-up, Doug. That would be particularly noticeable on the dark blue I've ordered. I do wonder, however, if it is your brush or just the fact that you're dragging salt/sand across the painted surface. (May get my leaf blower out and see how that works :biggrin:)
 

FlasherZ

Sig Model S + Sig Model X + Model 3 Resv
Jun 21, 2012
7,030
1,030
I might recommend you try a "bee brush" like those used to move bees around in the hive. They tend to be very soft so that they don't injure the bees -- for dry snow it works very, very well. For that wet, sloppy snow it doesn't seem strong enough. But it's a good place to start.
 

Albern

Member
Dec 1, 2007
220
16
Great question.

While I'm not a professional auto detailer, a fundamental rule to keep in mind is that if you want to mitigate scratches you should touch the body as little as possible. Since that is impractical in a number of instances, what do you do?

Since the regular snow brushes that are sold will obviously scratch the clear coat, I'd recommend getting a snow brush that has the bristles softened. Personally, on my cars I'll only clean the windows using the brush or squeegee and I'll used my gloved hand to wipe away any snow on the exterior lights. If there is a significant build up on the horizontal body panels, I'll try to brush that away without the bristles or the blade touching the surface.
 

Gizmotoy

Active Member
Sep 16, 2013
3,690
903
Bay Area, CA
I used to brush the windows and headlights and that's it on previous cars. The rest of the snow will blow off while driving. If you have the pano, I'd probably do the roof as well. Turn both the front and rear defrosters on before you leave and the snow blowing off the hood and roof won't stick to your windows.

I literally scratched the clear coat by touching it with the skin of my knuckle immediately after a thorough cleaning so it wasn't like I was grinding in some dirt. A snow brush will, undoubtedly, scratch it. I'd suspect even brushing the rough snow off with a cloth glove would scratch it.
 

Doug_G

Lead Moderator
Global Moderator
Apr 2, 2010
17,888
3,414
Ottawa, Canada
It's been pointed out that Tesla's just-in-time production and delivery means that their cars aren't sitting around for months before you receive them. For most manufacturers, the cars are sitting around for some months before they arrive at dealers, which gives most cars a chance for their paint to fully harden. So be very careful wiping the snow off your brand-new Tesla!
 

Doug_G

Lead Moderator
Global Moderator
Apr 2, 2010
17,888
3,414
Ottawa, Canada
Normally preheating the car will melt out the windshield, side windows, and pano. It's nice not to have to brush off the roof! However you should brush off the hood if it's got an inch of snow on it. If there's less it'll either stick or come off as soon as you move.

Definitely use a VERY SOFT brush, especially if your car is new. After some months the paint will get harder, but I learned the hard way last winter that it's VERY soft when you first get the car.
 
On FlasherZ's suggestion I ordered this from Amazon. They had a handful of similar ones but this looked reasonable and was the only Prime item so no shipping fee.

New 16" Natural Horse Hair Bee Hive Brush, Beekeeping Equipment by VIVO
Amazon.com: New 16 Garden

Arrives Tuesday - will post my impressions when I have a chance to use it.
I need something like that too. After many years of brushing snow off my jeep, the black paint on the windshield wiper arms looks terrible. At first I blamed the dealership (who washes the car when it goes in for service -- thought they were taking it to a car wash with the rotating brushes, but they said no.) It finally dawned on me that it was my hard plastic brush.

We often get high winds before a snow which deposits a layer of dust on the car as well as imbedding grit into the falling snow. Sweeping that off with with the greatest brush in the world can also scratch the finish. If the snow is really dirty I get out the hose ( but sometimes the doors freeze closed unless I crack them open and turn the heat on high to dry the seals. )
 
Normally preheating the car will melt out the windshield, side windows, and pano. It's nice not to have to brush off the roof! However you should brush off the hood if it's got an inch of snow on it. If there's less it'll either stick or come off as soon as you move.

Definitely use a VERY SOFT brush, especially if your car is new. After some months the paint will get harder, but I learned the hard way last winter that it's VERY soft when you first get the car.
Sometimes I just resort to the garden hose. see also
 

Doug_G

Lead Moderator
Global Moderator
Apr 2, 2010
17,888
3,414
Ottawa, Canada
I simply went through the pile at the local Canadian Tire feeling all the bristles until I found one I liked. They must have had over 20 different models.

A year later my paint is harder, too.

I'd be careful for at least several months... by then the paint should have fully hardened.
 

Doug_G

Lead Moderator
Global Moderator
Apr 2, 2010
17,888
3,414
Ottawa, Canada
Sometimes I just resort to the garden hose.

OMG that would be a disaster here. First of all the hose would be frozen solid unless you dragged it out from indoors. Then I'd spray the car and it would probably melt out a bit, and then freeze into a solid ice cube. (I once tried to wash my Roadster when it wasn't anywhere near this cold and I ended up with soapsickles.) And then my parking spot would be a skating rink for the rest of the winter. No thanks!
 
There are three different ways to solve this issue... The best way to fight a fire is as simple as using water...
Now you are probably thinking.. Well this guy must be a complete idiot, let me move on to another post, but I'd recommend you at least look at the options!

Option 1: Water down your car so that the unwanted ice is removed, then before the water freezes grab a leaf blower, but make sure it is an electric leaf blower because you can't let your neighbors catch you using a gas powered one especially if you are driving a Tesla, not good!! The leaf blower will blow away the water and ensure than little to no ice will remain on the car. After you are finished, throw down A LOT of salt to ensure that the excess water will not freeze. (This option works the best!)

Option 2: Water down your car so that the unwanted ice is removed, then before the water freezes use a squeegee (as shown in the link). This will allow the water to not freeze on the places that you care most about, such as but not limited to the windshield, roof, and rear windshield.

Option 3: Unfortunately, not everyone has the ability to plug in a leaf blower or use those big air polluting leaf blowers, so another solution is to simply.. put a cover over the car to ensure that ice or snow will ever reach the paint!

I hope this has helped!!

DISCLAIMER: I HAVE NOT TRIED THIS BEFORE, I WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY SLIP-AND-FALL INJURIEST THAT MIGHT OCCUR THROUGHOUT THE PROCESS. IF SOMEONE ACTUALLY TRIES THIS, DEFINITELY LET US NOW IF IT WORKS. :smile:
 

About Us

Formed in 2006, Tesla Motors Club (TMC) was the first independent online Tesla community. Today it remains the largest and most dynamic community of Tesla enthusiasts. Learn more.

Do you value your experience at TMC? Consider becoming a Supporting Member of Tesla Motors Club. As a thank you for your contribution, you'll get nearly no ads in the Community and Groups sections. Additional perks are available depending on the level of contribution. Please visit the Account Upgrades page for more details.


SUPPORT TMC
Top