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2022 LR Battery Replacement

I hit an object on the road which broke through the front skid plate and ripped away the battery coolant hose from the battery case.

Towed it in to service center after getting low coolant message and they are saying entire battery pack has to be replaced.

The estimate that they sent me lists the replacement battery pack as “ASY,HVBAT,75KWH,AWD-RWD,1PH,M3,RMN(1137375-01-W).

Does anyone know why the part number is listed as a 75kwh pack? My impression was that my car had the newer 82kwh pack in it. When I discussed it with the service advisor they just keep saying that my car had a 74kwh battery and that is what they are replacing it with.

Everything I can find on the internet points to the 2022 Model 3 LR as having Panasonic 2170L 82kwh.

Not sure what I should do as the service center just keeps going in a loop that my battery was a “74kwh” pack and that is what they are putting back in.

Service advisor tells me there has been no iteration of Model 3 with a 82kwh pack.
 

tm1v2

Active Member
Oct 18, 2021
2,327
2,008
USA
I hit an object on the road which broke through the front skid plate and ripped away the battery coolant hose from the battery case.

Towed it in to service center after getting low coolant message and they are saying entire battery pack has to be replaced.

The estimate that they sent me lists the replacement battery pack as “ASY,HVBAT,75KWH,AWD-RWD,1PH,M3,RMN(1137375-01-W).

Does anyone know why the part number is listed as a 75kwh pack? My impression was that my car had the newer 82kwh pack in it. When I discussed it with the service advisor they just keep saying that my car had a 74kwh battery and that is what they are replacing it with.

Everything I can find on the internet points to the 2022 Model 3 LR as having Panasonic 2170L 82kwh.

Not sure what I should do as the service center just keeps going in a loop that my battery was a “74kwh” pack and that is what they are putting back in.

Service advisor tells me there has been no iteration of Model 3 with a 82kwh pack.
@atxnate Get a picture of the part number on your current battery. Not sure where it is on a Model 3 actually, but I'm sure you can search the web for that. It was easy enough to see on my Model S without even lifting the car up.
 
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AlanSubie4Life

Efficiency Obsessed Member
Oct 22, 2018
14,192
18,263
San Diego
Just a Tesla thing. Yours is “82.1kWh” 82kWh, 77kWh usable, and that is what you should get. The only other option is “77.8kWh”, 78kWh, about 74-75kWh usable that was for prior years using different cells.

Can refer service advisor to page 65:


Awesome - thanks for sending this over. I sent it along to SA and will see what they say. I’m hoping it’s a weird issue with nomenclature that they call the newer packs 75kwh. Would an older battery pack be able to be installed? My LR is 4 months old and had around 318-320 miles at 90%. Is it unrealistic to expect after the repair to have similar range?
 
@atxnate Get a picture of the part number on your current battery. Not sure where it is on a Model 3 actually, but I'm sure you can search the web for that. It was easy enough to see on my Model S without even lifting the car up.
Unfortunately car has been sitting at the service center for a few weeks already. When I looked into finding battery label on the newer model 3s, a lot of people saying there’s no label anymore so not sure if I’d be able to find one.
 

jjrandorin

Moderator, Model 3, Tesla Energy Forums
Moderator
Nov 28, 2018
16,667
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Riverside Co. CA
Awesome - thanks for sending this over. I sent it along to SA and will see what they say. I’m hoping it’s a weird issue with nomenclature that they call the newer packs 75kwh. Would an older battery pack be able to be installed? My LR is 4 months old and had around 318-320 miles at 90%. Is it unrealistic to expect after the repair to have similar range?

IMO, what you should be expecting is exactly that (the same range you had previous to the replacement), regardless of what battery they put in there. You should expect to have at least the same capacity that you had previously. I am fairly sure that is what the warranty calls out, even though it does not specify new / remanufactured / used.
 
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AlanSubie4Life

Efficiency Obsessed Member
Oct 22, 2018
14,192
18,263
San Diego
My LR is 4 months old and had around 318-320 miles at 90%. Is it unrealistic to expect after the repair to have similar range?
You should expect similar. The 77.8kWh pack, unless perhaps it is brand new and especially good, will not be able to achieve that range of 356mi at 100%. It tops out around 354.

Note you are being quoted a remanufactured pack (RMN). The brand new ones cost more. But they should match it to your prior pack. Nothing wrong with reman if it is age matched. They have not used a 2170 pack in that car since early 2021 (all 2170L now).

You have to make sure you get the 82.1kWh “Full Pack When New” version.

It matters because if they are the same capacity (2170 and 2170L), you’d expect less capacity loss from that point from the 2170L. They both see similar capacity loss over time. But a 78kWh 2170 is brand new and will lose capacity rapidly, while a 78kWh 2170L has already lost a lot of capacity and will lose it more slowly going forward.

I am fairly confident Tesla will match your vehicle to the correct pack but you need to trust but verify. Good luck.
 
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MP3Mike

Well-Known Member
Feb 1, 2016
19,870
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I am fairly sure that is what the warranty calls out

Note you are being quoted a remanufactured pack (RMN). The brand new ones cost more. But they should match it to your prior pack. Nothing wrong with reman if it is age matched. They have not used a 2170 pack in that car since early 2021 (all 2170L now). They’ll

You both are missing that this isn't a warranty claim. He damaged his battery so is buying a replacement outside of the warranty. As a result Tesla isn't required to match capacity to what he had at all.

Given his car is only 4 months old I would push to have the insurance company pay for a new pack, not a remanufactured one.
 

jjrandorin

Moderator, Model 3, Tesla Energy Forums
Moderator
Nov 28, 2018
16,667
21,947
Riverside Co. CA
You both are missing that this isn't a warranty claim. He damaged his battery so is buying a replacement outside of the warranty. As a result Tesla isn't required to match capacity to what he had at all.

Given his car is only 4 months old I would push to have the insurance company pay for a new pack, not a remanufactured one.
I forgot that (that its not a warranty claim), thanks for pointing it out.
 

AlanSubie4Life

Efficiency Obsessed Member
Oct 22, 2018
14,192
18,263
San Diego
You both are missing that this isn't a warranty claim. He damaged his battery so is buying a replacement outside of the warranty.
I was not missing that. I pointed out that it is a reman pack. Yes, if you want your insurance company to pay more, they can pay for a brand new pack. It is several thousand more.

In either case it must be a 82.1kWh pack though.

I suspect that even if it is not a warranty claim, Tesla will try to match the reman pack to the existing one (this is something they do all the time after all). Though as you say they are not obligated to do so in that case, it looks very bad for them if they take the worst one off the shelf.
 
You should expect similar. The 77.8kWh pack, unless perhaps it is brand I new and especially good, will not be able to achieve that range of 356mi at 100%. It tops out around 354.

Note you are being quoted a remanufactured pack (RMN). The brand new ones cost more. But they should match it to your prior pack. Nothing wrong with reman if it is age matched. They have not used a 2170 pack in that car since early 2021 (all 2170L now).

You have to make sure you get the 82.1kWh “Full Pack When New” version.

It matters because if they are the same capacity (2170 and 2170L), you’d expect less capacity loss from that point from the 2170L. They both see similar capacity loss over time. But a 78kWh 2170 is brand new and will lose capacity rapidly, while a 78kWh 2170L has already lost a lot of capacity and will lose it more slowly going forward.

I am fairly confident Tesla will match your vehicle to the correct pack but you need to trust but verify. Good luck.

I forgot that (that its not a warranty claim), thanks for pointing it out.
I forgot that (that its not a warranty claim), thanks for pointing it out.
This isn’t a warranty claim but I feel like they are treating it as if it is. I have Tesla Insurance so it has been like pulling teeth to even get a response from my adjuster. I told him early in about the issue and he said he didn’t get an estimate from them yet (despite them sending it to me). I’ll try to reach back out to him as I feel like the Service Center has made it impossible to know what they are doing. My hope is that insurance would push for new replacement. I was initially told that there are no new packs and that all replacements done after the initial factory install would be remanufactured.
 
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AlanSubie4Life

Efficiency Obsessed Member
Oct 22, 2018
14,192
18,263
San Diego
Yes, if you want your insurance company to pay more, they can pay for a brand new pack. It is several thousand more

I would push to have the insurance company pay for a new pack, not a remanufactured one.

Question: is this something insurance company is obligated to pay for? Not sure how it works.

I certainly think this is a good idea.
 

AlanSubie4Life

Efficiency Obsessed Member
Oct 22, 2018
14,192
18,263
San Diego
BTW, your current pack capacity according to your datapoint is around 78.5kWh. It probably started between 79kWh and 80kWh for the 82.1kWh pack - possibly slightly higher but unlikely higher than 80.5kWh. (Not a lot of SMT data from 2022 that I have seen.)

No, it does not align with the 82kWh they got in the EPA test. But those values are measured differently. Possibly different kWh (not really but measured differently) and different conditions for sure.

79kWh will give you 358 at 100%.
 
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Question: is this something insurance company is obligated to pay for? Not sure how it works.

I certainly think this is a good idea.
Not sure if they are obligated - they seem to be treating this as if it’s a warranty claim but my initial thought was that my insurance company would be more invested in restoring value of the car and not putting a lower capacity pack in a 4 month old car. I guess the problem is where they blur the lines on measuring those things. I am starting to be frustrated in just trying to reach people at Tesla/Tesla Insurance to get any kind of answers or transparency. Service center tells me 82kwh packs don’t exist and that all packs installed on cars after they are outside of the factory are remanufactured. There’s just so much conflicting information from them and what we know, it’s hard to navigate. At this point I’m considering just selling it when I get it back and buying new. I don’t know that I can trust whatever they are trying to put back in. Even the process of replacing it sounds like a nightmare - they have to strip the interior out and put it back in. Not sure that I have the faith everything will go back in like it was. Sucks that the car was so new.
 

AlanSubie4Life

Efficiency Obsessed Member
Oct 22, 2018
14,192
18,263
San Diego
I hit an object on the road which broke through the front skid plate and ripped away the battery coolant hose from the battery case.
I can’t believe they haven’t fixed this obvious design flaw at this point. It would not be difficult to redesign the pack and the fittings so they are replaceable from outside the pack in most circumstances. It is so easy to damage this. Can even happen if something large kicks up in the wheel well and you get unlucky. Pure insanity.
 
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I can’t believe they haven’t fixed this obvious design flaw at this point. It would not be difficult to redesign the pack and the fittings so they are replaceable from outside the pack in most circumstances. It is so easy to damage this. Can even happen if something large kicks up in the wheel well and you get unlucky. Pure insanity.
Definitely agree with you there - I never realized how fragile that area was until this happened. Crazy that something that can destroy itself and result in a total battery replacement sits a few inches above the road.
 

MP3Mike

Well-Known Member
Feb 1, 2016
19,870
49,668
Oregon
If I owned the car, i.e. wasn't leasing it, I would probably have the insurance company pay me for the battery, and then I would do the Rich Rebuilds repair to my battery and continue driving the car. Then years down the road if it ever became a problem I could probably replace the battery at a lower cost with one that has less usage on it,
 
If I owned the car, i.e. wasn't leasing it, I would probably have the insurance company pay me for the battery, and then I would do the Rich Rebuilds repair to my battery and continue driving the car. Then years down the road if it ever became a problem I could probably replace the battery at a lower cost with one that has less usage on it,
Good point - I’m assuming the Rich Rebuilds repair would void the warranty? If I didn’t think it would be a problem in the future or I just outright owned the car I’d probably go for it as well and keep the insurance battery money for the future like you’re saying.

I’ve been floating the idea of just selling it when I get it back and starting over. Not sure if my ocd can trust that the reman. battery pack is the same and stripping out the interior and putting it back together didn’t add more issues. My first was a 2018 Model 3 MR and I just know how these things can go. Sucks that the wait time is so high for LR though - might be a good excuse to go for the M3P this time ;)
 
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AlanSubie4Life

Efficiency Obsessed Member
Oct 22, 2018
14,192
18,263
San Diego
I’m assuming the Rich Rebuilds repair would void the warranty?
The good news is that the warranty is already void on your pack, since it has been damaged. Nothing that happens to that pack from here on will be covered under warranty.

If you get the pack replaced you are good to go again on the warranty front. [ EDIT: apparently this is not true, you may not have the same length of warranty.]
 
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