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70D 2015/16 range on original battery

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I have a January 2016 Model S 70D and I’ve owned it since August 2020 (second hand with 29500 miles). It originally charged to 276 miles (100%) and today 5 Feb 2024 it still charges to 267 miles (100% with 95,000 miles). It has lost 9 miles of ultimate range in 3 and a half years. I’m reading others saying their same age and model is only charging to 214 miles (100%). Am I just lucky?? I supercharge 95% of the time and 5% at home.
 

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You have “ideal” range turned on (controls -> display). Change this setting to “rated” for an indication of your actual range.

The S70D was rated at 240 miles brand new.
Thank you. I have just learned something new. Is there a reason the “ideal” pie in the sky figure is quoted? Assuming it’s a sales and marketing angle??
 
Thank you. I have just learned something new. Is there a reason the “ideal” pie in the sky figure is quoted? Assuming it’s a sales and marketing angle??
It’s not quoted anywhere… someone had to have gone in and explicitly enabled this setting at some point in the past.

It’s unfortunately somewhat common with people selling used EVs as it gives the buyer the sense they’re buying a car with more range than it actually has.
 
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I have a January 2016 Model S 70D and I’ve owned it since August 2020 (second hand with 29500 miles). It originally charged to 276 miles (100%) and today 5 Feb 2024 it still charges to 267 miles (100% with 95,000 miles). It has lost 9 miles of ultimate range in 3 and a half years. I’m reading others saying their same age and model is only charging to 214 miles (100%). Am I just lucky?? I supercharge 95% of the time and 5% at home.
Your degradation over time looks pretty good. However, your mileage of 276 is not consistent with EPA rating of 240 mileage when new, as the post above states. Also, Europe had their own system (NEDC?) which was different than used in the U.S.

If you want to compare your car's absolute degradation in kWh, there is a sticky thread in the M3 forum that gives an easy way to calculate that using the energy screen. For the 70D, the starting kWh hours when new was just under 69 kWh. My car now only has about 55.8 kWh remaining, which is about 19% degradation since new. I am guessing that yours is probably much better than that.
 
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I have just learned something new. Is there a reason the “ideal” pie in the sky figure is quoted? Assuming it’s a sales and marketing angle??
Well, not quite. It's from some old history. As Tesla was developing the prototypes and getting ready to build the original Model S around 2010 or so, the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) in the U.S. had a different kind of testing and rating procedure that was more optimistic. Tesla was doing pre-advertising using those testing numbers. And around that time, shortly before the Model S launched in mid 2012, the EPA changed their rating method to make it more realistic. Tesla had to retest, and the numbers were lower. To explain why their published numbers used to be higher, they renamed that as "Ideal" and then published the new tested numbers as "Rated", since it was the new EPA rating. So it wasn't a sales thing. The rating method (and therefore numbers) changed.

Also, Europe had their own system (NEDC?) which was different than used in the U.S.
@FR13NDS1 Now this also gets to a terminology confusion. The EPA rating in the U.S. is a little optimistic, but the NEDC rating system used in Europe is just crazy fantasy optimistic. It's not even close, so it has really inflated numbers. But that is the "rated" value. So they have a lower, more realistic, number they call "Typical".

So in the North American cars, they are labeled as "Ideal" (higher) and "Rated" (lower).
In Europe, they are labeled as "Rated" (higher) and "Typical" (lower).
 
Well, not quite. It's from some old history. As Tesla was developing the prototypes and getting ready to build the original Model S around 2010 or so, the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) in the U.S. had a different kind of testing and rating procedure that was more optimistic. Tesla was doing pre-advertising using those testing numbers. And around that time, shortly before the Model S launched in mid 2012, the EPA changed their rating method to make it more realistic. Tesla had to retest, and the numbers were lower. To explain why their published numbers used to be higher, they renamed that as "Ideal" and then published the new tested numbers as "Rated", since it was the new EPA rating. So it wasn't a sales thing. The rating method (and therefore numbers) changed.


@FR13NDS1 Now this also gets to a terminology confusion. The EPA rating in the U.S. is a little optimistic, but the NEDC rating system used in Europe is just crazy fantasy optimistic. It's not even close, so it has really inflated numbers. But that is the "rated" value. So they have a lower, more realistic, number they call "Typical".

So in the North American cars, they are labeled as "Ideal" (higher) and "Rated" (lower).
In Europe, they are labeled as "Rated" (higher) and "Typical" (lower).
Thank you all for your informative replies. I have now changed the display and made some calculations. It appears I have a realistic 12% battery degradation from new which is better than I thought.
 
fyi, my 70D, according to toolbox v2, is on original battery, manu 2015/7 (the sticker fell off of it) and it did 177k miles.

According to SMT it have 61kWh capacity from original 66kWh, meaning only 8% loss.

Around 28% SuC usage lifetime and 32% last 40k miles since I bought it.