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Doing a brake job myself help please

Discussion in 'Model S' started by Bheuring, Mar 20, 2017.

  1. jaguar36

    jaguar36 Active Member

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    Tesla has started integrating the parking brake into the main caliper.
     
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  2. Lukez

    Lukez Member

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    Didn't know that, any idea when they started?
     
  3. jaguar36

    jaguar36 Active Member

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    December 2016
     
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  4. 182RG

    182RG Free The Service Manuals From Tyranny

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    All of my existing cars do this, thanks...

    1 manually screws in with the "block". 2 require using VAGCOM to roll them back electronically. Got it.

    I don't know why some of you are so insulting when it comes to believing individual owners are experienced mechanics as well?
     
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  5. JohnnyG

    JohnnyG Weee!

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    Just because the majority of people do it, doesn't make it right, smart, or safe...

    This statement is only true on the non-performance models.
     
  6. jelloslug

    jelloslug Active Member

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    Even an inexperienced mechanic can change brake pads properly.
     
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  7. zambono

    zambono Member

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    Thanks I asked for a DIY section on here a while back, the answer was to tag threads. This one should be tagged.
     
  8. phaduman

    phaduman Member

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    is it a cost-saving measure?
     
  9. Fusion

    Fusion Member

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    Some have more money than brains when it comes to making comments.

    Opps.... meant to type tagged..... haha
     
  10. FlatSix911

    FlatSix911 918 Hybrid

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    Brake Pads - Front - Set (Remove and Replace)
    FRT No: 33010702
    Warning: If the vehicle has air suspension, activate "Jack" mode on the touchscreen before raising and supporting the vehicle.
    Special tool required for this procedure:
    Supplier Part Number Description
    Tesla 1057223-00-A Hand Brush
    Removal
    1. Remove the rear underhood apron (refer to procedure).
    2. Remove the brake fluid reservoir cap.
      Caution: Clean the surrounding area prior to removing the component.
      Note: Place suitable absorbent material around the affected area to absorb any possible fluid spillage.
      upload_2017-3-29_20-4-47.png
    3. Remove the front wheels (refer to procedure).
    4. Remove the pad retaining pins and collect the anti-rattle spring.
      Note: Always check that the anti-rattle clip has not been damaged. This part is easily damaged and is important to help eliminate squeaks.
      upload_2017-3-29_20-5-18.png
    5. Use a suitable tool to gently push the pistons back into caliper.
    6. Remove the brake pads from the caliper.
      upload_2017-3-29_20-5-42.png
    7. Check that the caliper pad slides are dirt free and the seals are in good condition.
    Installation
    Installation procedure is the reverse of removal, except for the following:
    Note: Clean the affected areas before installation.
    • Thoroughly clean the caliper pad slides and abutments with a hand brush (1057223-00-A) and soapy water.
      Caution: If there is rust or pitting on the caliper that cannot be removed with a hand brush, replace the caliper (refer to procedure).
      upload_2017-3-29_20-5-57.png
    • Apply an even layer of Silaramic lubricant (1063021-00-A) to the caliper pad slides. Remove any excess lubricant.
    • Apply an even layer of copper paste between the shim and the backing plate. Remove any paste that squeezes out after installing the shim.
      upload_2017-3-29_20-6-10.png
      Caution: Ensure that the brake pads move freely.
      Caution: Do not apply copper paste to the caliper, seals, or any component other than the shim and backing plate.
    • Pump the brake pedal at least 5 times to seat the pads against the brake rotors.
      Warning: Always check that the brake pads are seated correctly before driving the vehicle.
    • Top off the brake fluid level as required.
      Caution: If brake fluid is spilled on a painted surface, wash off immediately with clean water.
    • Perform the burnishing procedure (refer to procedure).
     
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  11. Bheuring

    Bheuring Member

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    I agree 100 percent
     
  12. Ulmo

    Ulmo Active Member

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    uhhhhm ... that took me 5 seconds. It's a button in the upper left of the web site on a computer. (I don't know if it shows up on a smartphone.)
     
  13. Lasttoy

    Lasttoy Member

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    I went to NAPA, Same front pads are same as 2016 corvette, easy to change, takes 30 minutes if you have all the tools and good jack.
     
  14. NeoDog

    NeoDog Member

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    I changed my own brake pads once, decades ago. Then I plowed into a Cherokee from behind when it stopped short and my stopping distance was... not as short. In my case it's because I misjudged whether the rotors needed to be turned, and I didn't turn them. I was dirt poor and mechanically inclined (although, evidently, unskilled) when I decided I was going to pay good people to do that job from then on.

    Changing the pads is easy. Doing nothing else can directly make the car less safe (i.e. old pads are married to imperfect rotor, new pads aren't), so it's not enough to know how to change the pads. Generally speaking, it's not always easy to know when you've sufficiently educated yourself on how to do things safely.

    I don't see the problem with warning people about this. It's not a judgement that it can't be learned, or that readers aren't already capable. The worry is simply that the thread can easily provide just enough information to be dangerous to someone who doesn't already know better, and it's harder than it looks to actually know better, so it deserves an extra effort.
     
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  15. ⚡️ELECTROMAN⚡️

    ⚡️ELECTROMAN⚡️ Fritterer and waster of hours in an off hand wayer

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    Five years sounds good. I think most car manufactures recommend two year change intervals. I took my Lexus to Jim Bacon's Tire Factory to have all four brakes done. I was going to do it myself, but I am getting lazier in my old age, so I called around to check pricing. It was cheaper than I expected. I can't remember what it cost, but it wasn't worth the savings to do it myself. Anyway I asked them to replace my brake fluid because I thought it was probably at least four years old. They said they checked the fluid with a test strip and that it didn't need to be changed yet. I wonder how often the fluid should be checked with a test strip.
     
  16. Candleflame

    Candleflame Member

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    complete nonsense. And that is considering that we work our breaks much harder driving 90-130mph here
     
  17. phaduman

    phaduman Member

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    I have done brakes on my BMW (including rotor changes, and fluid flushes) and have done piston/caliper upgrades on my sienna because i hated the original brakes. I agree completely to the view that brake jobs can be easy, but also need attention, and it gets easier with experience. My trust on the mechanics isn't all that great either. The toyota dealer did a brake pad service for my sienna one time and they even forgot to put a pin back together. When I took it home, and tried to reverse the car, one wheel will lock - the pad would slip out and stop the rotor from turning. Putting the car forward - the pad would get back into its grove fine and car would be OK. Basically I couldn't reverse. I had to take small roads to the dealership, at low speeds and they were embarrassed.

    Given the $100K car and the speeds it can travel and the low tolerance level for any type of mistakes (they can be expensive), those who have never done brake jobs in the past shouldn't try their hands on a Tesla I would think. But for me, when the time comes, I would be willing to get the brake pads, rotors and fluid flush done by myself.
     
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  18. 182RG

    182RG Free The Service Manuals From Tyranny

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    @NeoDog, I don't disagree with you, at all. People should be cautious and understand their abilities.

    What I have a problem with is the undertone that some on here have, that Teslas are so complicated and technical, that
    no one should DIY. That's flat wrong.

    I get it. It's a different crowd. The MS and MX community seems (more than a bit) to be the "here's my credit card, I'll sit over here and sip my latte while you work on my car".
     
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  19. smartypnz

    smartypnz Supporting Member

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    Close to 110k miles. At 100k checkup was told most was 1 mm of wear. Full regen. Red car - so it goes faster (urban myth).
     
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  20. obrien28

    obrien28 Midnight Engineer

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    Chiming in with my two cents, I just completed a front brake rotor swap and brake flush (front brakes were shuddering and fluid was getting old). I can't add much more (on top of the service procedure) other than to say that getting the brake pins out to swap the pads can be a bit fiddly thanks to the rust, grime and brake dust build up, a good punch tool and some patience is all you need, then clean them off with a wire wheel to make it easier going back in or out (tip, you pound from the front to take them out). Also make sure the new brake pads have additional prongs coming off one side (see photo RHS), these hold the important anti-rattle clip/spring, I found this out by buying a pair of generic Bosch pads that didn't have it, I ended up not replacing the pads this time around since I want to keep the anti rattle spring, don't make my same mistake.

    Also, if you get new Tesla rotors, the latest ones come with some kind of grey powder coat, I think it may be a zinc rust inhibitor, I removed it from the surface of the rotor since I don't want anything coating the surface of my pads, however, you can leave it on the hat for aesthetics (that area tended to get nasty on the previous generation).

    Other than that nothing fancy or space age, do a good job, check all bolt torques, don't get any grease or anti-seize on the rotor or pad, and be careful painting the caliper, ChrisFix has a great youtube video on painting all those parts, might want to take a look. Over all my brakes feel WAY better now, very smooth and firm (TWSS), plus it was HALF the cost (even with ripoff tesla rotors).

    People really need to stop making such a big deal about DIY maintenance, as the driver of this car I have a VERY GOOD motive to do a professional job, my butt is in the front seat. If I can't stop the car effectively that is not a good situation for me or the hypothetical busload of nuns, puppies and unicorns I "might" run into (more than likely a dear or telephone pole round here). Stay safe and keep up the 100+ year old American tradition of "Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without", throwing away a car or parts because you didn't do basic maintenance or just want the "latest" is not very "green" in my opinion, my car may be "old hat" compared to a 2017 model, but Tesla will have to pry it (and my ratchet) from my cold dead hands, they don't call us Yankees for nothing.

    [​IMG]
     
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