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  • The latest TMC Podcast (#14) is now available on YouTube and all major podcast networks. We covered FSD Beta's exciting v11 update, Enhanced Autopilot coming to the U.S. and Canada, and more!

FSD Beta Experience - Be Careful What You Wish For

I've been in the FSD Beta since last Christmas. I'm reading many posts from people frustrated they are not on the Beta yet, and others who are on the Beta and complaining about it.

So, I want to give everyone my experiences with FSD Beta, try to make everyone understand what's involved in it, and hopefully dissuade several of you from trying to get into the Beta.

00EE7D8B-DFD2-4E41-B7F2-2D6BCB4E7B10.jpeg


It's a Commitment
----------------------------------
I think many people are excited by the notion of FSD Beta, and watching YouTube videos or Twitter videos of people in FSD Beta thinking it will be easy and smooth. Let me assure you that it's a commitment to be in FSD Beta. It's not easy, and it's not smooth. You are committing to use a system that is far from perfect and agreeing to help improve the system by putting the car through various routes, and reporting problems as they occur. You're not going to be using your car as you did before. If you're not willing to use FSD Beta as much as possible, and thinking you'll only use casually, then I'd suggest it's not for you. Tesla needs data to improve the system. The more data, the faster the system develops. And we, the FSD Beta participants, want the end result in our lifetimes. :) Think of it as an unpaid internship.

It's Stressful
----------------------------------
I read many posts on TMC from people who are stressed over the Safety Score before even getting invited into FSD Beta. They worry about pissing off cars around them as they "drive like grandma" to keep a high score. Once you're in the FSD Beta, your stress level will go up even higher. Now, your car may perform odd maneuvers, suddenly brake, swerve left or right just before a turn, become paralyzed at unprotected turns, turn in a very unnatural or unsmooth way (ie: jerky), etc. You will likely get flashed with high-beams and honked at. Personally, I get those at least twice a week. Occasionally a middle-finger is extended when someone aggressively goes around you and cuts you off. I've even been coal-rolled. You need to have a calm demeanor and understand that you will be pissing people off. I have custom bumper stickers warning people behind me to help ease some of the stress I'm causing them, or at least letting them know they should stay back or go around me.

It's Mentally and Physically Draining
----------------------------------
Gone are the times when your brain goes into autopilot when you're driving, listening to music, or talking on the phone. Instead, you're hyper focused on the drive. I tell my friends that 80-90% of the time FSD Beta drives very well. 10-20% of the time it tries to kill me. :) Because of that, you cannot let your guard down for a moment. Many testers have their foot hovering or ready to engage, as the car could suddenly slow down in the middle of a turn, or approaching a flashing yellow caution sign. It might mistake an angled traffic light that's not meant for your lane and suddenly attempt to run a red light. It could make a sudden lane change, or try to make a turn from the wrong lane. I've had it try to go straight through an intersection while in a right turn-only lane.

Constant Engagement and Disengagement - And Reporting
----------------------------------
You will be engaging the system and disengaging it constantly. Is it getting too close to that parked car? Coming too fast at a speed bump? Did it become paralyzed at a 4-way stop where pedestrians are crossing? Is it in the wrong lane for the exit you need to take, and going to miss it? In many cases you will need to disengage FSD, perform a maneuver yourself and then re-engage FSD - and report it to Tesla. It's also important that you report everything to Tesla so they can improve the system. That can be difficult, if your car just freaked out and you had to disengage FSD and take over instantly to avoid something bad from happening. Your first reaction isn't usually to find and press a little camera button to report it - but you have to get into that habit.

Passengers
----------------------------------
I do most of my FSD Beta driving alone, as the system can really freak out passengers - and in many cases cause motion sickness in those susceptible to it. I've read many posts from people who say their BF/GF or spouse simply will not let them use FSD Beta while they are in the car.

Final Thoughts
----------------------------------
Some people might read the above and think, "I just won't use FSD Beta that much." If you're thinking you'll use FSD Beta a little, perhaps setting aside time to do a small trip with it from time to time, but otherwise driving the car yourself, then I think FSD Beta is not for you. You're committing to help Tesla improve a system, and with limited Beta participants (currently ~60K), your casual attitude towards the program could be negatively affecting it. There may be someone like me who is ready to totally commit to it, but cannot get into the program because someone else took a spot who really doesn't care that much. Also, if you've read all this and thought "Tesla should be paying me to do all this!", then the FSD Beta is not for you.

So be careful what you wish for... FSD Beta is not all fun and games.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Knightshade

Well-Known Member
Jul 31, 2017
15,708
29,852
NC
if its purchased up front / afterwards or subscribe monthly. they are all the same version? is there a full version vs beta version??


Subscription is "you get whatever features are widely available during the month you subscribed, and you must have current HW to subscribe at all"

Purchase is "you get all listed features on the purchase page, including any not yet delivered (currently that is just autosteer on city streets) ...AND including any needed HW upgrades required for those features (if for example you've got an older car with only a HW2.0 or 2.5 driving computer when you buy FSD)"

Functionally they're the same at any given moment outside of the hardware thing.


Neither inherently includes access to the FSDBeta program that is running unfinished software not yet in wide release-- though there's a chance (but no guarantee) you may be able to join that program while have have access to FSD otherwise
 

drtimhill

Active Member
Apr 25, 2019
3,088
4,020
Seattle
How you pay for FSD has no bearing on which software version you are running. In fact, if you own a Tesla, your car already has the FSD software and just needs Tesla to enable it. If you sign up to FSD, you will be able to use it almost immediately.
This is true for "regular" FSD (e.g. Smart Summon), but not FSD beta, which uses different software builds than the non-beta stack.
 
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I've been in the FSD Beta since last Christmas. I'm reading many posts from people frustrated they are not on the Beta yet, and others who are on the Beta and complaining about it.

So, I want to give everyone my experiences with FSD Beta, try to make everyone understand what's involved in it, and hopefully dissuade several of you from trying to get into the Beta.

View attachment 773827


It's a Commitment
----------------------------------
I think many people are excited by the notion of FSD Beta, and watching YouTube videos or Twitter videos of people in FSD Beta thinking it will be easy and smooth. Let me assure you that it's a commitment to be in FSD Beta. It's not easy, and it's not smooth. You are committing to use a system that is far from perfect and agreeing to help improve the system by putting the car through various routes, and reporting problems as they occur. You're not going to be using your car as you did before. If you're not willing to use FSD Beta as much as possible, and thinking you'll only use casually, then I'd suggest it's not for you. Tesla needs data to improve the system. The more data, the faster the system develops. And we, the FSD Beta participants, want the end result in our lifetimes. :) Think of it as an unpaid internship.

It's Stressful
----------------------------------
I read many posts on TMC from people who are stressed over the Safety Score before even getting invited into FSD Beta. They worry about pissing off cars around them as they "drive like grandma" to keep a high score. Once you're in the FSD Beta, your stress level will go up even higher. Now, your car may perform odd maneuvers, suddenly brake, swerve left or right just before a turn, become paralyzed at unprotected turns, turn in a very unnatural or unsmooth way (ie: jerky), etc. You will likely get flashed with high-beams and honked at. Personally, I get those at least twice a week. Occasionally a middle-finger is extended when someone aggressively goes around you and cuts you off. I've even been coal-rolled. You need to have a calm demeanor and understand that you will be pissing people off. I have custom bumper stickers warning people behind me to help ease some of the stress I'm causing them, or at least letting them know they should stay back or go around me.

It's Mentally and Physically Draining
----------------------------------
Gone are the times when your brain goes into autopilot when you're driving, listening to music, or talking on the phone. Instead, you're hyper focused on the drive. I tell my friends that 80-90% of the time FSD Beta drives very well. 10-20% of the time it tries to kill me. :) Because of that, you cannot let your guard down for a moment. Many testers have their foot hovering or ready to engage, as the car could suddenly slow down in the middle of a turn, or approaching a flashing yellow caution sign. It might mistake an angled traffic light that's not meant for your lane and suddenly attempt to run a red light. It could make a sudden lane change, or try to make a turn from the wrong lane. I've had it try to go straight through an intersection while in a right turn-only lane.

Constant Engagement and Disengagement - And Reporting
----------------------------------
You will be engaging the system and disengaging it constantly. Is it getting too close to that parked car? Coming too fast at a speed bump? Did it become paralyzed at a 4-way stop where pedestrians are crossing? Is it in the wrong lane for the exit you need to take, and going to miss it? In many cases you will need to disengage FSD, perform a maneuver yourself and then re-engage FSD - and report it to Tesla. It's also important that you report everything to Tesla so they can improve the system. That can be difficult, if your car just freaked out and you had to disengage FSD and take over instantly to avoid something bad from happening. Your first reaction isn't usually to find and press a little camera button to report it - but you have to get into that habit.

Passengers
----------------------------------
I do most of my FSD Beta driving alone, as the system can really freak out passengers - and in many cases cause motion sickness in those susceptible to it. I've read many posts from people who say their BF/GF or spouse simply will not let them use FSD Beta while they are in the car.

Final Thoughts
----------------------------------
Some people might read the above and think, "I just won't use FSD Beta that much." If you're thinking you'll use FSD Beta a little, perhaps setting aside time to do a small trip with it from time to time, but otherwise driving the car yourself, then I think FSD Beta is not for you. You're committing to help Tesla improve a system, and with limited Beta participants (currently ~60K), your casual attitude towards the program could be negatively affecting it. There may be someone like me who is ready to totally commit to it, but cannot get into the program because someone else took a spot who really doesn't care that much. Also, if you've read all this and thought "Tesla should be paying me to do all this!", then the FSD Beta is not for you.

So be careful what you wish for... FSD Beta is not all fun and games.
I purchased FSD on my model X Plaid and took delivery last December. I assume that my car has the FSD software since I paid for it, yet I have no idea how to activate it. I’ve used navigate on autopilot but no idea if FSD is activated or not? Can anyone tell me how I can activate it?
 
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I purchased FSD on my model X Plaid and took delivery last December. I assume that my car has the FSD software since I paid for it, yet I have no idea how to activate it. I’ve used navigate on autopilot but no idea if FSD is activated or not? Can anyone tell me how I can activate it?
You have FSD, but aren't in the FSD Beta. If you go into settings and Autopilot, you'll find a button to request FSD Beta access. It'll put you in a queue. You then have to maintain a high safety score until Tesla decides to accept you.
 
I've been in the FSD Beta for months now. It's not great. It makes driving very stressful. I'm leaving the Beta because I am not willing to risk my life on something that Elon says will "definitely" happen this year. As he has done year after year after year. At this point I really see Lucid or Mercedes reaching a real level 3 before Tesla.
 
Consolation for those still waiting to get into the FSD Beta program

I've been there, trying in vain to get my safety score up (before I turned off Autopilot) and feeling envy each time a new tranche of beta testers was added. I finally got it Christmas morning, hardly trusting my eyes that I really had it.

But in practice, the FSD Beta isn't useful for much more than making FSD Beta videos. Let me detail the reasons for that opinion (as of 10.10.2):
  1. The FSD Beta doesn't work on controlled-access highways, period. As soon as you go up the ramp to the interstate highway, FSD shuts off and you're left with the regular Navigate on Autopilot.
  2. In the slightest amount of rain, FSD shuts off and you're left with Autopilot.
  3. If the car is doing all the driving, routing becomes really important and FSD does a lousy job of routing. It changes lanes when it shouldn't. It will say "changing lanes to follow route" when it's already in the only correct lane for the route. It frequently moves into a turn-only lane when you're not turning and gets stuck. It will pull into a cul-de-sac to reverse direction and get stuck. It tries to pass stopped cars, even when those cars are stopped at a traffic light or in dangerous situations. It takes incredibly stupid long detours.
  4. You can't use it with stop signs in traffic. The car will drive safely, but in practice the excruciatingly long delays making turns will not only cause you to miss many opportunities to find a gap in traffic, but it makes you wonder whether it's going to creep out too far and cause an accident while infuriating the drivers behind you.
  5. You can't go through gates because it will just crash through the gate arm.
  6. It activates the turn signal inappropriately going around turns, but doesn't use them at all when changing lanes.
  7. It will on rare occasions run stop signs.
  8. It will stop for "traffic control" that does not exist.
  9. It will changes lanes to avoid "traffic cones" that do not exist.
  10. It will drive dangerously fast on streets that have perpendicular parking on them.
  11. It jams on the brakes for no reason.
  12. It doesn't handle improperly-labeled 4-way stops.
  13. It doesn't work in parking lots.
  14. It accelerates and brakes in an uncomfortable way.
  15. The wheel jerks sharply and swings from side to side.
  16. You end up having to use the accelerator at almost every intersection.
About all that FSD practically automates is partially implementing automated turn signals, and slowing down for turns. Beyond that you'll pretty much have to intervene all the time. The public FSD is a great package, but the beta doesn't add much that you can actually use now.
 
I've been in the FSD Beta for months now. It's not great. It makes driving very stressful. I'm leaving the Beta because I am not willing to risk my life on something that Elon says will "definitely" happen this year. As he has done year after year after year. At this point I really see Lucid or Mercedes reaching a real level 3 before Tesla.

Using FSD beta is at times relaxing and fun but is just as often very stressful. Many people seem to be eager to get into the FSD beta program because they want the FSD software as soon as possible. What they fail to realize is beta software is by definition buggy. It is guaranteed to make mistakes and the entire purpose of having people in the beta program is to have more people using it in real life situations so the bugs can be discovered, documented and fixed. That means constantly paying attention because you can't depend on the software, dealing with all the quirks and mistakes that it makes and reporting the bugs you find. If this isn't for you then you're probably better off waiting for a later release.

From what you describe, it sounds like leaving the beta program is a wise decision for you. I have no idea where Lucid or Mercedes are in their development process, but I can guarantee you they will go through the same stage, whether the public is involved to experience it or not.
 

drtimhill

Active Member
Apr 25, 2019
3,088
4,020
Seattle
About all that FSD practically automates is partially implementing automated turn signals, and slowing down for turns. Beyond that you'll pretty much have to intervene all the time. The public FSD is a great package, but the beta doesn't add much that you can actually use now.
Yeah, they should keep it as beta and only let a select number of people test it .. oh .. er .. wait a minute!

And I dont know when you last tested it, but many of the issues you mention are either gone or significantly mitigated.
 
Using FSD beta is at times relaxing and fun but is just as often very stressful. Many people seem to be eager to get into the FSD beta program because they want the FSD software as soon as possible. What they fail to realize is beta software is by definition buggy. It is guaranteed to make mistakes and the entire purpose of having people in the beta program is to have more people using it in real life situations so the bugs can be discovered, documented and fixed. That means constantly paying attention because you can't depend on the software, dealing with all the quirks and mistakes that it makes and reporting the bugs you find. If this isn't for you then you're probably better off waiting for a later release.

From what you describe, it sounds like leaving the beta program is a wise decision for you. I have no idea where Lucid or Mercedes are in their development process, but I can guarantee you they will go through the same stage, whether the public is involved to experience it or not.
I think that the other manufacturers that are using LIDAR will benefit from that advantage. However, we will not know for sure for a while. Even basic autopilot phantom breaks for me all the time on the highway (I have a Vision Tesla). The shine is wearing off of Tesla, at least for me. Don't get me wrong, in every other way it's a great vehicle. But the competition is going to heat up.
 
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@SouthFLGuy I'm not so sure about that. I used FSD Beta and encountered almost every single issue @LastGas mentioned in just over two hours of driving! That's on a 2021 Model Y (with Radar) running FSD Beta 10.10.2 (2021.44.30.21).

I found myself nodding along because it so accurately captured reality. Yes, sometimes it's almost magically good in some cases, especially handling curvy roads and slowing down appropriately. It's done impressively well on a steep, curvy mountainous road nearby.

But outside dense urban areas (or YouTube videos 😆), reality is a different story.

Today I drove from Rome, GA to Dallas, GA, for example. Instead of merging into an upcoming left turn lane as it opens, the car simply continues straight. At the last moment before the stop line, it decides to hop over rapidly. And being an AI with courtesy, it activates the left turn signal after it's already crossed into the other lane. But that's a longstanding issue; and I'm sure it'll improve over time.

On a positive note, it successfully slowed from 70MPH on HWY 411 while going downhill, turned on the right blinker well in advance, and performed a flawless 90 degree turn yielding to traffic turning from the opposite direction.

Previously, the car made turned right, merging onto a busy two-lane road. But then the car abruptly slowed to 25 MPH (on a road where cars typically go 55-60 MPH). I could see the speed limit sign way ahead. But the cars mapping data was apparently wrong, and reported a speed limit of 25 MPH. Just imagine the drivers behind me having to brake (potentially creating an unsafe situation), and then wait for the car to slowly creep forward until it passes the speed limit sign. These types of speed changes requiring manual tweaks happen all the time.

The worse incident I've ever experienced occurred later on HWY 41. Approaching a major intersection, there's only two lanes. They both go straight across the intersection. Nothing complicated.

And yet, instead of staying in its lane, the car started turning left and drove directly into a huge gore area (with the white chevrons/diagonals).

I quickly glanced at the map to see if it was attempting to make a left turn left for some bizarre reason (and trying cross the gore area to the forked lane some 50 feet away). I always keep my hands hovering at 9 & 3 and took over immediately. But the car was already entirely within the ~25 ft wide gore area. I was able to turn the car back toward the right, drive across the gore area, and merge into the left lane. Thankfully there was still enough space between the driver behind me.

Not only is that highly illegal, it's also extremely dangerous. Had there been a cop around, I certainly would've been stoped. And likely hit with a huge fine. I'm sure other drivers thought I was some asshole, or otherwise impaired.

I tapped the camera button to send feedback. I want to say it was this intersection, but not positive. 34.16151° N, 84.78877° W. I'll check the recordings; hopefully it's still available and I'll post.

For what it's worth, I'm a software developer with a fair amount of machine learning experience. Tesla is in a league of their own, and their prodigious rate of improvements continues to astound. For more info on what's involved at a high level, the Dave Lee interview with James Douma is worth watching:

But the breathless videos highlighting 0 interventions need to be put in context. Those videos don't represent typical driving in other areas of the country, with far greater speed differentials, limited visibility, sharp curves, etc. As @LastGas mentioned, FSD Beta is basically useless at stop signs. It stops way before the line, moves forward with great hesitation, and then creeps forward. You have to press the accelerator all the time to make it do anything. And when you press the accelerator, you often don't know if it'll continue approaching the stop sign because it's still 5 feet from the stop line, continue creeping forward and into the oncoming lane, or "commit now"--and crash into the oncoming vehicle barreling around a curve at 60 MPH.

As I discovered today, there's one situation where it managed to handle a stop sign like a human. Turns out you need 4 of them! It approached the stop line without the usual apprehension, and handled the right of way logic like a champ (third vehicle to cross). I believe that was the first four-way stop I'd encountered while using using FSD Beta. Consider me impressed.

And, funny enough, that's what you typically see in YouTube videos. Four-way stops at comparatively slow speeds. That's not the same as "I need to stop at the stop line, wait for an opportunity to cross two lanes of traffic with vehicles of all types going 75 MPH with limited gaps, stop in the median, wait for an opportunity to execute a left turn into traffic traveling 75 MPH in the opposite direction. That's a daily occurrence for my father, and many others. It's also terrible road design, but such is reality.

The standard Autopilot on highways and interstates is incredible. It works well, it's predictable, and makes driving so much less stressful--especially for long trips. That alone makes Tesla's worth it 😍. But FSD Beta is a different beast. On a positive note, things continue to improve, and quickly.
 
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I’m in need of some basic information about FSD. I purchased a model X Plaid with FSD in January of this year. As far as I know, all the settings for autopilot and FSD are correct. Yet, I don’t know what I actually bought with regard to FSD beta? No clue how to activate it or participate in the beta test. The most I can do is navigate on autopilot. Can anyone explain what my $10,000 FSD option provided?
 

Knightshade

Well-Known Member
Jul 31, 2017
15,708
29,852
NC
I’m in need of some basic information about FSD. I purchased a model X Plaid with FSD in January of this year. As far as I know, all the settings for autopilot and FSD are correct. Yet, I don’t know what I actually bought with regard to FSD beta?

Nothing.

FSDBeta is not a product you can buy.

It's a limited access test group. You can request access to it if you otherwise have the actual-sold-version of FSD- but only in the US and Canada right now- and they haven't added new folks to it in a while

The most I can do is navigate on autopilot. Can anyone explain what my $10,000 FSD option provided?

This was detailed on the purchase page.

See an example screen shot below: (note this shot is from late 2020- they have since changed "later this year" wording on autosteer on city streets to "coming soon" as they missed the last 2 years they promised it "later this year"- but that's still not a delivered feature as of today, it's one you're still owed)

fsdpur.jpg
 
Last edited:
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See an example screen shot below: (note this shot is from late 2019- they have since changed "later this year" wording on autosteer on city streets to "coming soon" as they missed the last 2 years they promised it "later this year"- but that's still not a delivered feature as of today, it's one you're still owed)
It's funny that even you have lost track of all the changes. haha. In 2019 they actually sold "Automatic driving on city streets" which IMO is very different from "Autosteer on city streets"
 

Knightshade

Well-Known Member
Jul 31, 2017
15,708
29,852
NC
It's funny that even you have lost track of all the changes. haha. In 2019 they actually sold "Automatic driving on city streets" which IMO is very different from "Autosteer on city streets"

Sorry, corrected my post to say late 2020 (the change you mention was made roughly April 2020 IIRC)

But since they provided no details on either item it's arguable how different the actual "owed" feature may or may not be....and obviously they missed the "coming later this year" bit to everyone who bought post march 2019 until they removed the "later this year" wording a couple years later.
 
I've been in the FSD Beta since last Christmas. I'm reading many posts from people frustrated they are not on the Beta yet, and others who are on the Beta and complaining about it.

So, I want to give everyone my experiences with FSD Beta, try to make everyone understand what's involved in it, and hopefully dissuade several of you from trying to get into the Beta.

View attachment 773827


It's a Commitment
----------------------------------
I think many people are excited by the notion of FSD Beta, and watching YouTube videos or Twitter videos of people in FSD Beta thinking it will be easy and smooth. Let me assure you that it's a commitment to be in FSD Beta. It's not easy, and it's not smooth. You are committing to use a system that is far from perfect and agreeing to help improve the system by putting the car through various routes, and reporting problems as they occur. You're not going to be using your car as you did before. If you're not willing to use FSD Beta as much as possible, and thinking you'll only use casually, then I'd suggest it's not for you. Tesla needs data to improve the system. The more data, the faster the system develops. And we, the FSD Beta participants, want the end result in our lifetimes. :) Think of it as an unpaid internship.

It's Stressful
----------------------------------
I read many posts on TMC from people who are stressed over the Safety Score before even getting invited into FSD Beta. They worry about pissing off cars around them as they "drive like grandma" to keep a high score. Once you're in the FSD Beta, your stress level will go up even higher. Now, your car may perform odd maneuvers, suddenly brake, swerve left or right just before a turn, become paralyzed at unprotected turns, turn in a very unnatural or unsmooth way (ie: jerky), etc. You will likely get flashed with high-beams and honked at. Personally, I get those at least twice a week. Occasionally a middle-finger is extended when someone aggressively goes around you and cuts you off. I've even been coal-rolled. You need to have a calm demeanor and understand that you will be pissing people off. I have custom bumper stickers warning people behind me to help ease some of the stress I'm causing them, or at least letting them know they should stay back or go around me.

It's Mentally and Physically Draining
----------------------------------
Gone are the times when your brain goes into autopilot when you're driving, listening to music, or talking on the phone. Instead, you're hyper focused on the drive. I tell my friends that 80-90% of the time FSD Beta drives very well. 10-20% of the time it tries to kill me. :) Because of that, you cannot let your guard down for a moment. Many testers have their foot hovering or ready to engage, as the car could suddenly slow down in the middle of a turn, or approaching a flashing yellow caution sign. It might mistake an angled traffic light that's not meant for your lane and suddenly attempt to run a red light. It could make a sudden lane change, or try to make a turn from the wrong lane. I've had it try to go straight through an intersection while in a right turn-only lane.

Constant Engagement and Disengagement - And Reporting
----------------------------------
You will be engaging the system and disengaging it constantly. Is it getting too close to that parked car? Coming too fast at a speed bump? Did it become paralyzed at a 4-way stop where pedestrians are crossing? Is it in the wrong lane for the exit you need to take, and going to miss it? In many cases you will need to disengage FSD, perform a maneuver yourself and then re-engage FSD - and report it to Tesla. It's also important that you report everything to Tesla so they can improve the system. That can be difficult, if your car just freaked out and you had to disengage FSD and take over instantly to avoid something bad from happening. Your first reaction isn't usually to find and press a little camera button to report it - but you have to get into that habit.

Passengers
----------------------------------
I do most of my FSD Beta driving alone, as the system can really freak out passengers - and in many cases cause motion sickness in those susceptible to it. I've read many posts from people who say their BF/GF or spouse simply will not let them use FSD Beta while they are in the car.

Final Thoughts
----------------------------------
Some people might read the above and think, "I just won't use FSD Beta that much." If you're thinking you'll use FSD Beta a little, perhaps setting aside time to do a small trip with it from time to time, but otherwise driving the car yourself, then I think FSD Beta is not for you. You're committing to help Tesla improve a system, and with limited Beta participants (currently ~60K), your casual attitude towards the program could be negatively affecting it. There may be someone like me who is ready to totally commit to it, but cannot get into the program because someone else took a spot who really doesn't care that much. Also, if you've read all this and thought "Tesla should be paying me to do all this!", then the FSD Beta is not for you.

So be careful what you wish for... FSD Beta is not all fun and games.
Thank you very much for posting this educational piece. I wish a link could appear on google search
 
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...

So be careful what you wish for... FSD Beta is not all fun and games.
I fully agree objectively with what you say. FSD Beta does all that stuff; however, I don't find it particularly stressful, but one does have to be very vigilant. And of course, most of my driving is on rural highways where the car works slightly better on tight curves than Autopilot does.
 
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