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How long do brake pads last?

Discussion in 'Model S: Driving Dynamics' started by kirkbauer, Mar 9, 2016.

  1. kirkbauer

    kirkbauer Member

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    Normally on a heavy car you'd go through a lot of brake pads, but on the MS I find that I use the brakes very little due to regen.

    Has anybody had to replace their brake pads on their MS? If so how many miles?
     
  2. Soolim

    Soolim Member

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    It will last forever until Tesla decides to save cost. :wink:
     
  3. sorka

    sorka Active Member

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    I almost never use the brakes, brake pads should last forever. My 217K mile Prius has the original pads and about 85% left.
     
  4. benjiejr

    benjiejr Technogeekextraordinaire

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    ^Amazing!!
     
  5. dhrivnak

    dhrivnak Active Member

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    When we sold our Prius at 135,000 miles the original brakes were still good. My Avalanche with 104,000 miles still look good. A little anticipation can go a long way in saving brakes.

    And my Roadster with 37,000 miles still has good pad left on the originals
     
  6. David99

    David99 Active Member

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    Yeah I anticipate the brake pads will last as long as the car will drive. Regen does most of the work.
     
  7. widodh

    widodh Model S R231 EU

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    I just had a look at mine after 115.000km. They looked brand new! They will last long, very long
     
  8. MorrisonHiker

    MorrisonHiker Beta Tester

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    I replaced the brake pads on my '97 CR-V for the first time around 185,000 miles. :)
     
  9. P85DBeast

    P85DBeast 3 Model S!! 85D,P85D,P100D

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    I foresee that the pads will last very long. Thats because my car has 68K Miles on it and the brakes still look brand new along with the rotors. But on my wife's Tahoe thats a totally different story.....:frown:
     
  10. jerry33

    jerry33 S85 - VIN:P05130 - 3/2/13

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    They'll likely rot out before they wear out. The Prius had over 165K miles and lots of pad left. The Model S uses the brakes less than the Prius.
     
  11. ferdboyce

    ferdboyce "GASKIKR"

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    Using TACC I find that the 'autopilot' uses a fair amount of braking in traffic at times/places where I wouldn't, as I can anticipate better than the camera can. I wonder how much effect this will have on brake pad wear. . .
     
  12. dhanson865

    dhanson865 Active Member

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    I'd check the pads every 100,000 miles after it's out of warranty if you don't have the Tesla Service center do it. So long as you aren't racing or don't live at the top of a mountain you probably won't ever replace the pads short of a mechanical failure.

    Pretty much the brake pads should outlast the majority of the parts on the car. Maybe somewhere in the 300,000 to 800,000 mile range depending on driving habits?
     
  13. ImperialG

    ImperialG Member

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    I just got my front pads and rotors changed at 94,000 miles.
     
    • Informative x 1
  14. shelbri

    shelbri Member

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    I just had all four calipers and pads changed as well as my front rotors. They lads were rusted to the calipers. I believe this is an issue resulting from lack of use due to regen along with being in New England on the salty winter roads. 43k miles. Never had this issue before.
     
  15. chriSharek

    chriSharek Member

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    There's a solution to this . . . FLORIDA! :)

    Had new tires put on my 2011 Volt at 82,000 miles. The mechanics said there was 80% of the brake life left on pads. The pads on MS should last forever if you're using the standard regen setting - and 1-foot driving.
     
  16. scottm

    scottm Active Member

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    Rotors warp on this car before pads ever wear.
     
  17. AWDtsla

    AWDtsla Active Member

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    You will not warp the rotors. You will get uneven pad deposits from bad braking habits and corrosion. If you haven't bothered to clear the brakes properly often enough, getting the rotors turned is a cheap option.
     
  18. scottm

    scottm Active Member

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    #18 scottm, Mar 28, 2016
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2016
    Tell me more... mustn't have seen the clearing brake in the user manual. As a result I've never done it. (On any car I've owned).

    What I have done is this..

    When I noticed my brakes felt "pulsatingly grabby" upon applying moderate brake pedal pressure... not what I'd call steering wheel inducing oscillations I associate more strongly with rotor warp... that "steering shake" feel is not dominant here..

    Well, what I have gone out and done is some hard long stopping cycles from high speed... enough to heat the rotors real well. Hoping to burn off any deposits or rusty patches on the discs. The discs don't look blotchy, they're uniformly shiny bright metal. From what I can see through the wheel spokes.

    I haven't popped off the wheels yet and measured disc warp or visually inspected front and back sides of discs. I'll do that when I change over to summer tires. And I'll use brake cleaner and spray everything clean when I do that too.

    Maybe that will help.
     
    • Informative x 1
  19. NielsChr

    NielsChr Member

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    first thing I did when i got my tesla #2 was to apply anti rust grease/spray on the brakesystem (as well as other exposed areas near wheels/under frunk) I know i shouldent but it has worked well and it brakes just as good as ever.

    i suspect this will prevent rust and result in longer life of the brakecallipers.
     
  20. AWDtsla

    AWDtsla Active Member

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    It's very very hard to physically "warp" the rotor. You can however eventually create hotspots that mess up the metallurgy on the rotor, which is harder (but not impossible) to recover from. The process is not in any manual. But I've had very good luck with it. It's more relevant for the Model S than most other cars. If the rotors are dirty, lets say surface rust after sitting in the rain, you should do some long and light braking to clear off the corrosion, without heating the rotors excessively until the rust is gone. Then you should have long and medium braking (short of ABS engagement) to evenly apply pad deposits and heat to the rotor, you should NOT come to a full stop during this process, the rotors should be allowed to cool evenly after braking. You are effectively rebedding the pads. You should never brake hard if the rotors are pulsing, because you're creating unven pad deposits and hotspots.

    If the above does not stop the vibration, you can resort to more intense methods. First get the rotor turned (surface machined). The tech will probably swear to you that it won't fix the problem, he's kinda right. Bake the rotors at 500F and back to room temperature twice. Install back on car. Rebed the pads carefully eventually reaching very high rotor temps, and letting them naturally cool while moving.
     

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