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How to deal with phantom braking?

The camera recalibration process can take a lot longer than 5-10 miles. That distance gets 90-95% if the job done in my experience. Another 50-100 miles are required to reach 100%.

Also, can someone explain why recalibrating cameras is necessary? What changes/drifts in the system over time to invalidate the original calibration?
When I picked mine up new, they were calibrated when my odometer hit 53 miles. I’ve never once recalibrated and I’m at 47,000 miles with FSD performing flawlessly…
 
Okay, sure. LOL

Tesla pretty much invented phantom braking. It's a big problem for them and they've been investigated by the NHTSA. I know that Nissan had an issue too with their Rogue. But the fact of the matter is that it's not a big problem for any other automaker. Does that mean it can't happen? Nope. It just means that it's not a widespread issue anywhere near what Tesla is dealing with.

I guess I'm just extremely lucky that I have three vehicles from three completely different manufacturers (American, Japanese, German) and none of them had ever had a single occurrence of phantom braking.
I'm not sure where you are getting your info from but I had a 2019 and a 2021 Prius Prime and they both did phantom breaking. I had it check out at Roseville Toyota about it and everything checked out. Toyota said sometimes it just happens because of little things on the road or because of shadows. But with my Toyota's I only had phantom breaking maybe 10 times from 2019 to 2021.
 
Okay, sure. LOL

Tesla pretty much invented phantom braking. It's a big problem for them and they've been investigated by the NHTSA. I know that Nissan had an issue too with their Rogue. But the fact of the matter is that it's not a big problem for any other automaker. Does that mean it can't happen? Nope. It just means that it's not a widespread issue anywhere near what Tesla is dealing with.

I guess I'm just extremely lucky that I have three vehicles from three completely different manufacturers (American, Japanese, German) and none of them had ever had a single occurrence of phantom braking.
Here is a link my friend sent me, he commented on it because of his phantom breaking in his Honda.

People talk about how they experience phantom breaking with Honda, Toyota, VW, and Ford. That's just one google search for phantom breaking with cars other than Tesla.

I'm not totally sure why you would say no other brands have phantom breaking. In my office I've got four people with four different vehicles and they all do phantom breaking.
 
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If Tesla really wanted to attack this problem they should add a dedicated PB icon at the top of the screen that the driver would hit whenever there was a PB event. It would then send all relevant data to Tesla and they would know that it was a PB occurrence. They would get a mountain of data to evaluate and I have to believe that they'd be able to figure out how to minimize this problem.
 

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If Tesla really wanted to attack this problem they should add a dedicated PB icon at the top of the screen that the driver would hit whenever there was a PB event. It would then send all relevant data to Tesla and they would know that it was a PB occurrence. They would get a mountain of data to evaluate and I have to believe that they'd be able to figure out how to minimize this problem.
True, but it would take resources back at TEsla, to review those additional reports/mountain of data.
and with some resources having to "voluntarily" go fill in for the mass engineer exodus at (failing) Twitter, might not be an option.
 
Your words can be taken as such.
Yeah he said it's "not a big problem" mostly because no one buys a Honda and then uses its crappy ADAS system or even how to engage it. It's only a big problem for Tesla because they make it simple to use and it's relatively good.

(Source: my wife owned a 2018 Honda Clarity with crappy ADAS...it was basically unusable...can't have PB events when you never engage the system.)
 
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Yeah he said it's "not a big problem" mostly because no one buys a Honda and then uses its crappy ADAS system or even how to engage it. It's only a big problem for Tesla because they make it simple to use and it's relatively good.

(Source: my wife owned a 2018 Honda Clarity with crappy ADAS...it was basically unusable...can't have PB events when you never engage the system.)
I’ve driven a rental Toyota Camry with lane keep assist (or whatever they call it) and can say that it sucked. I was much happier when I figured out how to disable it.

PB is not a problem of Lane Keep Assist or AutoPilot, though, it’s a problem with Adaptive Cruise Control/TACC and Auto Emergency Braking. Other cars may have problems but the problems are orders of magnitude greater with Tesla. Of all the people I’ve talked to that have non-Tesla cars with TACC and/or AEB, I haven’t spoken to a single on that has experienced PB. For Tesla owners, the reverse is true - I haven’t heard of a single one that hasn’t experienced it.
 
If Tesla really wanted to attack this problem they should add a dedicated PB icon at the top of the screen that the driver would hit whenever there was a PB event. It would then send all relevant data to Tesla and they would know that it was a PB occurrence. They would get a mountain of data to evaluate and I have to believe that they'd be able to figure out how to minimize this problem.

That's actually a really good idea and something that could easily be implemented. Who knows, maybe that will be on a future software update.
 
That's actually a really good idea and something that could easily be implemented. Who knows, maybe that will be on a future software update.
The problem is so well-known they must have plenty of data for it already --
there are so many Tesla employee/drivers that any data campaigns can just involve them.

I personally haven't noticed it so much since the advent of "Tesla Vision". Although
I drive the latest FSDbeta now, I actually expect it more for city driving; Tesla annotates it
as "false slowdowns" in the release notes. Triggers: over-sensitivity to pedestrian intent
(but "VRU kinematics" improves with every release), changing execution plans in
the middle of a turn or an intersection due to planner bugs, etc.

One unnerving possibility is that for certain complex situations, compute power just plain
runs out (at least for combinations of any given software release and HW3), and the software
temporarily freezes/hangs with a petit-mal seizure until the next appropriate hard-realtime
interval obtains.

Now didn't that all sound like I know what I'm talking about? Ha, I are just a retired engineer!
Seriously, if someone ever can ask this at a cocktail party to a sufficiently high-up engineer
at Tesla, they may just spill the reason.
 
I found that PB was a major worry when 'Forward Collision Warning' was at any setting other than 'Late'. From the M3 Owner's manual:

By default, Forward Collision Warning is turned on. To turn it off or adjust its sensitivity, touch Controls > Autopilot > Forward Collision Warning. Instead of the default warning level of Medium, you can turn the warning Off, or you can choose to be warned Late or Early.

Using the 'Early' or 'Medium' settings nearly caused a potential rear ending when the car PBed.

It might just be my impressions but it seems to me that there's a correlation between PB and 'Forward Collision Warning' settings.
 
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I found that PB was a major worry when 'Forward Collision Warning' was at any setting other than 'Late'. From the M3 Owner's manual:



Using the 'Early' or 'Medium' settings nearly caused a potential rear ending when the car PBed.

It might just be my impressions but it seems to me that there's a correlation between PB and 'Forward Collision Warning' settings.
On the other hand I have FCWs set to early and hardly ever have PBs... so...who knows. (On FSDb 10.69.3.1, 2018 Model 3)
 

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