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Blog Lucid Air Dream Edition Rated at 520 Miles of Range



The Environmental Protection Agency has given the upcoming Lucid Air Dream Edition a preliminary range rating of 520 miles, the first electric vehicle to cross the 500-mile mark.

Performance has been a big promise of the Lucid vehicles as it aims to be a meaningful challenger to Tesla’s flagship vehicles. Lucid’s range rating is 100 miles more than the Tesla Model S Long Range.

“I’m delighted that our Lucid Air Dream Edition Range has been officially accredited with a range of 520 miles by the EPA, a number I believe to be a new record for any EV. Crucially, this landmark has been achieved by Lucid’s world-leading in-house EV technology, not by simply installing an oversize battery pack,” CEO and CTO Peter Rawlinson said in a release. “Our race-proven 900V battery and BMS technology, our miniaturized drive units, coupled with our Wunderbox technology endow Lucid Air with ultra-high efficiency, enabling it to travel more miles from less battery energy. The next generation EV has truly arrived!”

The company noted in a release that multiple Lucid Air models have received their official EPA range ratings, including the Dream Edition Performance and Grand Touring versions on both 19” and 21” wheels. That positions Lucid Air models in the top six spots for overall EPA range ratings among all EVs as well as the highest MPGe ratings in the Large vehicle class.

The first Lucid vehicles are expected to be delivered by the end of the year.

 
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SO16

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Well, I don’t like road trips in general, so I’m not the best person to ask! I will say that auto pilot on the highway is awesome and makes for a very relaxing drive.

what do you like better about your model S vs an ICE car? There’s probably an element of how you approach it. Some people like to drive 600 miles a day and get there as quickly as they can, others take a more leisurely approach. Charging stops would be a nuisance for the former and an opportunity for the latter.
I take a more leisurely approach. AP is nice but I just simply like driving the car. It’s smooth, comfortable and quiet. If I did cannonball run style, an EV wouldn’t work for me.
 

dipper

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SC with family on road trips are not always fun, especially traveling late at night. Try finding a restroom. Unless Elon Musk adds restrooms for every SC stops, it is dependant on surrounding businesses for relief. Which means another stop at gas station before/after SC.
 
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WhiteWi

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SC with family on road trips are not always fun, especially traveling late at night. Try finding a restroom. Unless Elon Musk adds restrooms for every SC stops, it is dependant on surrounding businesses for relief. Which means another stop at gas station before/after SC.
When I was young and kidless I would drive only at night and with min stops as possible. Me at 38 and 3 kids later can’t stay up after 12am and need to stop at least every 3 hours or less for a stretch.
 

abasile

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2. "520 miles of range is obsolete; you'll never need that much."
- For someone who has gone on road trips in a Tesla with 220 miles of range, it definitely is helpful to not have to go out of the way for certain superchargers, but it's definitely not a hassle to have to stop for supercharging. I do believe that a 500+ mile range would be far more useful for a work truck such as the Cybertruck, but it's also great that Lucid has made a car with such range.
It can be a hassle to frequently stop for Supercharging with bicycles on a hitch-mount rack or on the roof, or when pulling a trailer.

For those into camping at national parks, there clearly are limitations with the extent of electrical infrastructure and Supercharger locations. For instance, while camping at 8600' in Yosemite's high country, we've needed to drive 40 minutes out of our way, each way, down to Mammoth Lakes to Supercharge so that we can continue driving around the park to access trailheads, etc. When visiting other national parks, we've sometimes needed to camp at nearby RV parks for charging purposes.

More range will clearly help with those use cases, for all of the S-3-X-Y vehicles. On the other hand, it's unclear how many people will buy $170k sedans and use them for carrying bikes, towing trailers, or camping! The tri-motor Cybertruck will be awesome.
 
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BooMan

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If you're longest daily drive is 100 miles, you need a 200 mile EPA range, dude. It's gotta cover your 100 mile trip in the winter with the heater cranked up with 10 years of battery degradation plus a quick side trip to the grocery store without stressing you out. Rule of thumb for EV range: take whatever's you're longest daily trip that you don't wanna stop to charge, and double that.
Exactly. That’s the flaw in these people now implying somehow more range is bad. Like why? In the real world you don’t get EPA unless you drive like miss Daisy. In the real world that 50 mile commute means you need an EV with at least 250 miles because guess what - some people live in places that have real winter (temps below 50F six months a year) with snow and wind. I would only consider a short range (<250mi EPA) if I lived in southern call or south Florida. Otherwise I can’t see it working in real daily use where you can’t always predict how you may use it. Now when L3 charging is ubiquitous this all changes. Until then the more range the better with an EV. Always
 

WhiteWi

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Exactly. That’s the flaw in these people now implying somehow more range is bad. Like why? In the real world you don’t get EPA unless you drive like miss Daisy. In the real world that 50 mile commute means you need an EV with at least 250 miles because guess what - some people live in places that have real winter (temps below 50F six months a year) with snow and wind. I would only consider a short range (<250mi EPA) if I lived in southern call or south Florida. Otherwise I can’t see it working in real daily use where you can’t always predict how you may use it. Now when L3 charging is ubiquitous this all changes. Until then the more range the better with an EV. Always
50 mile commute doesn’t need 250 mile range even in winter that’s just false!
 
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sleepydoc

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Exactly. That’s the flaw in these people now implying somehow more range is bad. Like why? In the real world you don’t get EPA unless you drive like miss Daisy. In the real world that 50 mile commute means you need an EV with at least 250 miles because guess what - some people live in places that have real winter (temps below 50F six months a year) with snow and wind. I would only consider a short range (<250mi EPA) if I lived in southern call or south Florida. Otherwise I can’t see it working in real daily use where you can’t always predict how you may use it. Now when L3 charging is ubiquitous this all changes. Until then the more range the better with an EV. Always
More range isn't bad per se, but it does consume more resources (for battery production,) and add expense to the car, and if people are incorrectly using it as a reason they can't buy a car either because they can't afford a car with the higher range or because they are artificially limiting their choices then there is an indirect harm.

I live in Minneapolis - we get cold weather and snow on a regular basis and the 300 mile range of my model Y is still way more than I truly need.
 
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Moks

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More range isn't bad per se, but it does consume more resources (for battery production,) and add expense to the car, and if people are incorrectly using it as a reason they can't buy a car either because they can't afford a car with the higher range or because they are artificially limiting their choices then there is an indirect harm.

I live in Minneapolis - we get cold weather and snow on a regular basis and the 300 mile range of my model Y is still way more than I truly need.
I live in Minneapolis too and my 265 mile (if at 100%, but I charge at 80%) range Model S is very adequate for my daily drives to work, groceries, and any errands I need to make on my way back home.
 

Sklith

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I'd rather get the largest available battery I can afford whenever buying an EV mainly for the fact that you'll have a much better charging curve when fast charging it. Also, fewer cycles on the battery with larger packs given the same energy consumption.
 
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LCR1

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Oct 24, 2017
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Any real world examples of Lucid range? not yet? okay. will wait...

yes, I'd actually be disappointed it someone doesn't post a Lucid prototype doing 500 miles.

I want to see these in the driving hands of customers. Then let the compares begin!
Why does it need to be in the hands of customers? Tesla has an epa rating and so does lucid, that’s a direct comparison.
 

finman100

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because some out there don't trust EPA testing. "EPA lies" is all the rage, doncha know.

seriously, people actually think real world "driving" with zero controlled metrics and varible conditions is the actual range of an EV. Not some gov't controlled test that has strict guide lines and parameters that makes for an accurate comparison.

weird.
 

BooMan

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because some out there don't trust EPA testing. "EPA lies" is all the rage, doncha know.

seriously, people actually think real world "driving" with zero controlled metrics and varible conditions is the actual range of an EV. Not some gov't controlled test that has strict guide lines and parameters that makes for an accurate comparison.

weird.
If those govt/EPA test are not even remotely like real world conditions AND allow OEMs to randomly choose correction factors the test are in no way useful for comparison. That last bit (correction factors) completely destroys the “apples to apples “ point you are trying to make. No way around that one unless all OEMs are forced to now use the same correction factor. This EPA #s are essentially useless data for comparison purposes. Also explains why some OEMs get significantly more or less range in “real world” conditions.
 

BooMan

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I live in Minneapolis too and my 265 mile (if at 100%, but I charge at 80%) range Model S is very adequate for my daily drives to work, groceries, and any errands I need to make on my way back home.
Well I live in similarly cold area (Michigan) and in winter here I have to continuously think about making that unplanned extra stop to the mall, store, school etc… not an everyday thing but also not exactly rare. Also I charge to ~80% thus already not getting the b “EPA” #. Also Also if I am on the hwy for some of that daily/weekend driving you can definitely start getting uncomfortably close to danger level. In my ICE it’s a non issue (can get gas anywhere). I am pro ev but I am also a realist. Stuff happens and it will likely happen that day you forgot to plug in the night before thus leave with only 50% vs 80% now you are in bind. Fortunately we have 3 cars thus a non issue for me BUT would be a major driver for picking a longer range ev (if able).
 

WhiteWi

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Well I live in similarly cold area (Michigan) and in winter here I have to continuously think about making that unplanned extra stop to the mall, store, school etc… not an everyday thing but also not exactly rare. Also I charge to ~80% thus already not getting the b “EPA” #. Also Also if I am on the hwy for some of that daily/weekend driving you can definitely start getting uncomfortably close to danger level. In my ICE it’s a non issue (can get gas anywhere). I am pro ev but I am also a realist. Stuff happens and it will likely happen that day you forgot to plug in the night before thus leave with only 50% vs 80% now you are in bind. Fortunately we have 3 cars thus a non issue for me BUT would be a major driver for picking a longer range ev (if able).
So you completely ignored you false statement about 50 miles in winter needs 250 miles of avail range before and came up with what if you forgot to charge night before. Got ya.
 

Takumi

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You know how it goes. Only anything good if made by Tesla.

Even if Elon Musk bottled his fart, people will give positive things to say about it as long as it is from Tesla. ;)

I didn't say/write it, but it is what it is!
 
When I have the camper on and am pulling my fairground organ trailer my F350 diesel has a range of about 230 miles. I can tell you it is a serious PITA. I'm too big to access the pumps at most service stations, so I'm limited mostly to truck stops. More than once when traveling off the interstates I've had to resort to the spare 5 gal can of fuel I carry with me to make it to a station. Not bad training for a future EV, I'd say. At least the EVs have pretty good route planning software, there's no way to tell in advance whether you can get to the pumps at a given station that allegedly sells diesel.

Of course when I consider a cybertruck (or the Lightning), it is to laugh, as they say. Their range would be exactly zero with that kind of load.
 
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BooMan

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So you completely ignored you false statement about 50 miles in winter needs 250 miles of avail range before and came up with what if you forgot to charge night before. Got ya.
Not false at all. Who in the heck only needs 50mi range ever? My grandma (MSRIP), maybe but most people, even with avg commutes would be beyond stupid if they were buying an ev with sub 250 mile range. I can’t imagine all of the compromises you would have to make. In winter and at 80% normal daily charging (if you charge most EVs to 100% everyday you = fool), typical ~5% degradation after a couple years, 20% range hit in winter (I’ve experienced worse when it gets really cold) and normal range hit with normal hwy driving speed (75 to 80mph) you are ow down to ~150mi. So if all you EVER do is drive 50 mi (not likely) you may be ok but that is an extreme outlier. That would only work in a multi car family and still not optimal cause again, what happens when wifey/husband ask you to go pick up kids from band camp after work. Oh and pick up dinner. Oh and can you go to mall to pick up xyz. Oh and your homies want you to swing by and watch the game. And of course you didn’t plan for any of this the night before so you only did normal daily charge (80%). Not everyday for sure but not exactly twice a year either.
Sub 250 EVs only work for multi car and even then not well. But hey you do you if you think range doesn’t matter. Pretty sure most (dam near everyone) disagree though. Not saying your wrong. Just saying.
 

WhiteWi

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Not false at all. Who in the heck only needs 50mi range ever? My grandma (MSRIP), maybe but most people, even with avg commutes would be beyond stupid if they were buying an ev with sub 250 mile range. I can’t imagine all of the compromises you would have to make. In winter and at 80% normal daily charging (if you charge most EVs to 100% everyday you = fool), typical ~5% degradation after a couple years, 20% range hit in winter (I’ve experienced worse when it gets really cold) and normal range hit with normal hwy driving speed (75 to 80mph) you are ow down to ~150mi. So if all you EVER do is drive 50 mi (not likely) you may be ok but that is an extreme outlier. That would only work in a multi car family and still not optimal cause again, what happens when wifey/husband ask you to go pick up kids from band camp after work. Oh and pick up dinner. Oh and can you go to mall to pick up xyz. Oh and your homies want you to swing by and watch the game. And of course you didn’t plan for any of this the night before so you only did normal daily charge (80%). Not everyday for sure but not exactly twice a year either.
Sub 250 EVs only work for multi car and even then not well. But hey you do you if you think range doesn’t matter. Pretty sure most (dam near everyone) disagree though. Not saying your wrong. Just saying.
Lol two Teslas no other cars 3 kids and we are doing just fine with 310 model 3 and 230 old model S. My wife cooks home and I go to bars with homies and all the jazz, outdoor activities with kids plus after school programs and everything in between. Your unbelievable edge cases are amazing but whatever makes you happy to talk false narrative about EV cars.
 
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