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Model S RHD Pedal positioning

I really don't like the pedal positioning in this car. Not only do they seem skewed to the right for me so that there's no space for my foot on the right of the accelerator pedal, more importantly the brake and accelerator pedals are on different planes. I'm finding it much easier to drive with 2 feet instead of using one just because 1 foot driving involves an extra step of changing planes - the brake pedal is much closer to the seat than the accelerator. I suppose I'll get used to it but its annoying, as are the constant resulting 'both pedals pressed' warning chimes that are much more likely than if I were able to use only 1 foot.
 
I really don't like the pedal positioning in this car. Not only do they seem skewed to the right for me so that there's no space for my foot on the right of the accelerator pedal, more importantly the brake and accelerator pedals are on different planes. I'm finding it much easier to drive with 2 feet instead of using one just because 1 foot driving involves an extra step of changing planes - the brake pedal is much closer to the seat than the accelerator. I suppose I'll get used to it but its annoying, as are the constant resulting 'both pedals pressed' warning chimes that are much more likely than if I were able to use only 1 foot.

On the right footrest issue, that used to bother me until I read on another thread to just use the accelerator pedal to rest on, and found that you in fact can. It seems easy enough to rest lightly there without overriding TACC.
 

meloccom

Moderator Aus/NZ
Moderator
Feb 11, 2008
2,494
1,463
Sydney Australia
Moderators Note
I have renamed this thread to Model S RHD Pedal positioning.
It would be nice if all posters of new threads were aware that this is an International Site based in the USA and name the threads accordingly.
The 'New Post' search at the top of the page has no regional search filter and Owners of LHD Model S will most likely mistakenly post in this thread which is not what you want.
 

paulp

Active Member
Jul 23, 2015
3,301
1,675
Adelaide, Australia
I really don't like the pedal positioning in this car. Not only do they seem skewed to the right for me so that there's no space for my foot on the right of the accelerator pedal, more importantly the brake and accelerator pedals are on different planes. I'm finding it much easier to drive with 2 feet instead of using one just because 1 foot driving involves an extra step of changing planes - the brake pedal is much closer to the seat than the accelerator. I suppose I'll get used to it but its annoying, as are the constant resulting 'both pedals pressed' warning chimes that are much more likely than if I were able to use only 1 foot.
The location of the pedals all feel normal to me, indeed hadn't even considered them as an issue
 

CHG-ON

Still in love after all these miles
Jun 24, 2014
3,079
648
Santa Cruz Mountains, USA
I am LHD and am OK with the positioning. But I got a VIN 10XXX loaner recently and both pedals were on the exact same plane and so close together that even when wearing dress shoes, I kept hitting the brake and go pedal at the same time. Maddening. So the difference in plane works well for me. My brake does not feel to close, compared to the go. Of course, in an ICE, having them on the same plane allows for great heel and toe driving; something we cannot do in the MS.
 

paulp

Active Member
Jul 23, 2015
3,301
1,675
Adelaide, Australia
If I'm 1 foot driving I like to pivot my foot around my heel from the brake to the accelerator peddle. Because the plane of the brake pedal is closer, it either means that my foot is uncomfortably dorsiflexed or I have to lift my heel. 2 foot driving s easier except I keep getting that '2 pedals pressed' alarm all the time.
I think there is a requirement in the australian design rules that the brake pedal must sit forward of tbe accelerator pedal.
 
Personally, I have been driving 2 feet for over 10 years now, and the advantages are numerous...
It tates 'time' to lift off, move foot left, apply brake. (may be worse if brake pedal is higher than accelerator pedal.
If you are reading the road ahead, you can pre-position your left foot over the brake, ready for a quick reaction.
e.g. Traffic lights may tun red soon, prepare left foot... traffic slowing, get ready to brake etc etc
 
Personally, I have been driving 2 feet for over 10 years now, and the advantages are numerous...
It tates 'time' to lift off, move foot left, apply brake. (may be worse if brake pedal is higher than accelerator pedal.
If you are reading the road ahead, you can pre-position your left foot over the brake, ready for a quick reaction.
e.g. Traffic lights may tun red soon, prepare left foot... traffic slowing, get ready to brake etc etc

Im happy with 2 foot driving, in fact prefer it, but the 'both pedals pressed' alarm goes off regularly, so regularly 9and the alarm can't be turned off0 that I'm trying hard to revert to 1 foot driving
 

paulp

Active Member
Jul 23, 2015
3,301
1,675
Adelaide, Australia
Im happy with 2 foot driving, in fact prefer it, but the 'both pedals pressed' alarm goes off regularly, so regularly 9and the alarm can't be turned off0 that I'm trying hard to revert to 1 foot driving

If the alarm is going off continuously, it means you are accelerating and braking at the same time.
There is ample research and discussion on this topic, and the general conclusion is that 2 foot driving (in non-manual cars) is dangerous, and does not improve brake reaction times.
 
If the alarm is going off continuously, it means you are accelerating and braking at the same time.
There is ample research and discussion on this topic, and the general conclusion is that 2 foot driving (in non-manual cars) is dangerous, and does not improve brake reaction times.
I've been doing 'something dangerous' for 15 years then. The different plane of the 2 pedals is clearly not an issue for anyone else but drastically extends my response time shifting my right foot closer to the seat and across from the accelerator to the brake. I can't leave my heel on the floor and just pivot my foot like I've been able to do on other cars. Clearly only an issue for me.
 

paulp

Active Member
Jul 23, 2015
3,301
1,675
Adelaide, Australia
I've been doing 'something dangerous' for 15 years then. The different plane of the 2 pedals is clearly not an issue for anyone else but drastically extends my response time shifting my right foot closer to the seat and across from the accelerator to the brake. I can't leave my heel on the floor and just pivot my foot like I've been able to do on other cars. Clearly only an issue for me.

Interesting that my tesla, audi, bmw, and suzuki swift all have the pedal offset. I think it's so that when you brake with the right foot you can't accidently accelerate by pressing the accelerator as well at the same time with the same foot. Probably more an issue for people with larger feet, perhaps?
Also interesting to note that even seasoned professional racing drivers can become confused when 2 foot driving under a rare panic situation. It's mandated for example that if an F1 driver presses both peddles to the floor, the brake must over-ride everything else.
 
If the alarm is going off continuously, it means you are accelerating and braking at the same time.
There is ample research and discussion on this topic, and the general conclusion is that 2 foot driving (in non-manual cars) is dangerous, and does not improve brake reaction times.

Sorry, I have to disagree. There are numerous examples (on youtube) of race car drivers using right foot to heel/toe AND left foot on the clutch, or using the right foot on the gas, and left foot on or over the brake to dab the brakes entering a corner to settle the car. It is not dangerous, just involves learning a different driving style (which I did when racing).

Another example is drag racing. How do the drivers get such good reaction times? It sure isn't done using the right foot on the brake. It is just too slow. Same goes for normal driving. If you want faster reaction times (for all circumstances) use both feet. The difference is staggering how much quicker you can react (if you think ahead). Even if it means only 0.1 or 0.2 seconds quicker, that could be all the difference between stopping & crashing into someone.

As for research... If anyone has made a serious attempt at research, they would have tested race drivers to see what the real difference is. I don't believe that they have, based on your claims.

See: HOW TO LEFT FOOT BRAKE - YouTube
(Listen to the commentary re 2 pedal braking)

GH
 

Astroboy747

Member
Aug 24, 2015
138
3
Earth
Sorry, I have to disagree. There are numerous examples (on youtube) of race car drivers using right foot to heel/toe AND left foot on the clutch, or using the right foot on the gas, and left foot on or over the brake to dab the brakes entering a corner to settle the car. It is not dangerous, just involves learning a different driving style (which I did when racing).

Another example is drag racing. How do the drivers get such good reaction times? It sure isn't done using the right foot on the brake. It is just too slow. Same goes for normal driving. If you want faster reaction times (for all circumstances) use both feet. The difference is staggering how much quicker you can react (if you think ahead). Even if it means only 0.1 or 0.2 seconds quicker, that could be all the difference between stopping & crashing into someone.

As for research... If anyone has made a serious attempt at research, they would have tested race drivers to see what the real difference is. I don't believe that they have, based on your claims.

See: HOW TO LEFT FOOT BRAKE - YouTube
(Listen to the commentary re 2 pedal braking)

GH

Could not have said it better myself. I drive an X5 and the brake is also so far away from the accelerator that you can't pivot your foot. It's perfect for two foot driving. I feel so out of control when driving with one foot. I can do it but I seriously dislike it. Funny how it is frowned upon but there are many states in the world that advocate and encourage it.
 

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