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EVTripplanner Accuracy

Discussion in 'Model S' started by Tribaltech, Dec 18, 2016.

  1. Snerruc

    Snerruc Member

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    Palm Bay
    Every time I have used the car trip planner, it has been accurate. I have to use a speed correction of 1.2 on Evtripplanner to match actual.
     
  2. green1

    green1 Active Member

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    Location:
    Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    Come north, try again. You'll never get through the Canadian rockies relying on the in-car planner.
     
    • Like x 1
  3. X Fan

    X Fan Supporting Member

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    Naples, FL & OIB, NC

    haha...or anywhere South of Va. in the States....
     
  4. Bgarret

    Bgarret Model 3 ownin' Michigan scofflaw

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    Tribaltech. Welcome to a fellow Michigan Tesla owner. Right after I bought mine, I drove from Chicago to NYC to Maine, through NE and upstate NY, Canada, back across Michigan to Grand Haven. It was the summer, but maybe this can help:

    1. Don't worry too much at the first 20 miles in the winter, let the car/battery warm up before you worry too much about your consumption.
    2. Detailed EV driving tips by Doug are here: The Rules of Model S Road Tripping
    3. The only times I've gotten sideways is when I've broken the rules: skipped superchargers uneccessarily or not had a backup plan in case the supercharger was out (has happened twice). Each time I've adapted and it's worked out fine.
    4. Having a general idea of different charging options/networks and a familiarity with how to use them will give you piece of mind. I was in a relative charging wilderness around Bath, ME and became comfortable scouting chargers and navigating different systems. Have the pre-paid fobs for Chargepoint and whatever other systems are fairly common where you are driving. This will save you a bunch of calls from a cold car.
    5. Super chargers/Highways are great for speed, but I've also found budgeting a little more time and taking a slower, more efficient path is more enjoyable. You may not have the luxury in the winter, but "Route 66" driving in the summer is great.
    6. Pick your dining and lodging based on charger availability, makes the time go quickly.
    7. For anxiety mitigation, learn some skills like hypermilling or battery management. They will make what is generally uncontrollable (dropping charge) at least feel a little manageable.
    8. Enjoy. You are still an early adopter.
     
    • Like x 1
  5. Snerruc

    Snerruc Member

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    Are you kidding! North to me is Maui.
     
    • Funny x 4
  6. GHammer

    GHammer What a long strange trip its been.

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2016
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    Location:
    Wren, Oregon
    I have driven all over the western US and the elevation data has been spot on. Must be a Canadian thing.
     
    • Like x 2
    • Informative x 1
  7. green1

    green1 Active Member

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    To be fair, I don't entirely know what data the car has wrong on those sections of road, I know it has the speed limit wrong, but there has to be more based on the estimates it gives, because even driving at what it thinks the speed limit is (10 under what the posted limit is) you won't make it. My best guess is that the elevation data is wrong. It looks reasonable on the graph, but it's possibly the right shape, but not the right magnitude.
     
  8. Bridor

    Bridor Member

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    Mar 20, 2016
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    Location:
    Maricopa, Arizona
    I only use the in car trip planner. I already posted my road trip to New York and back to Anaheim, California. I got in the car on Saturday morning at 6:30 am with my three kids, pushed the microphone button and said, "Navigate to Ark Encounter" and away we went. I actually do a 50% buffer when charging so that I can speed if I want to. So if the next supercharger is 100 miles away, do not leave until you have 150 miles of energy. Other than that, if you hit strong head winds, slow down to 55 and you should have no issues. I arrived at the Ark Encounter Monday morning at 8:30 am - the fastest I have ever driven that distance in any type of car. I am a little bit different than the average individual, I just cat napped at night when I pulled into a supercharger. I didn't get a hotel until Tuesday night in Erie, Pennsylvania. I chose that location because the city was near a supercharger. I do not like to plan things out. I like to be spontaneous. I love that the vehicles made by Tesla are the only electric vehicles that allow you to do such a trip.

    Previously, I started out on a long trip in my 2013 Blue Nissan Leaf. After sitting four hours at the first charging spot, I turned around and went home.

    I love Tesla and am looking forward to the small crossover.

    Brent
     
  9. _jal_

    _jal_ Member

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    Dec 6, 2016
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    Location:
    Chicago
    I've had my car for 5 days, but I've had subzero temps and done one 150 mile round trip ... trip. Today was barely freezing, but we had a stiff westerly wind - 15-20 mph. I took my brother to lunch and told him to watch energy consumption. It went from 350 Wh/mi on the way there (into the wind) to 275 on the way back. That's a huge change. Same went for severely cold temps. It seems that the offline trip planners' (not the onboard one) ability to put in parameters are a real help in estimating beyond-normal energy consumption.
     
  10. 2krazykats

    2krazykats Member

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    Aug 20, 2015
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    Location:
    CO
    Has anyone tried using evtripplanner or evtripping or abetterrouteplanner, etc using the Tesla web browser on a trip? Just wondering how the response is with the browser. It'll be interesting to compare it to Tesla's built in planner.
     
    • Like x 1
  11. thimel

    thimel Member

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    Feb 27, 2015
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    590
    I've tried evtripplanner. It doesn't get formatted properly in the tesla browser.
     
  12. MorrisonHiker

    MorrisonHiker S 100D 2020.44.15

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    I had a couple minor issues with abetterrouteplanner in the Tesla browser originally but the developer fixed all of the issues that I mentioned to him. I'll be putting it to a test during a long road trip this weekend.
     
    • Like x 1
  13. jbcarioca

    jbcarioca Active Member

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    4,868
    I still use the incar planner while on the road because none of the others respond well in the Tesla browser.
    of them all, my personal favorite is abettertripplanner.com. It has all the metrics you need, although not so many as does evtripplanner. abettertripplanner is very, very fast and pretty much glitchlesss, for me anyway. EVTripping I have used a little and have no major problems, but it hasn't attracted me much.

    A couple general comments about all of them:
    1. None permit complete entry of expected weather. to be fair, since I am an airplane pilot I am accustomed to having current expected altitudes winds, temperatures and precipitation entries, automated or manual. A couple of them do calculate altitude changes, like evtripplanner, and that greatly improves accuracy.
    2. there are substantial differences in consumption based on exact model and wheel combinations. EVtripplanner is the winner on that detail.

    Frankly, you'll probably end out gravitating to one or another. I find myself experimenting with different ones. I always learn something new when I try a new one.

    Otherwise I plan conservatively to arrive with at least 20% reserve. Taht way I am normally prepared for whatever happens.

    Last, when you get high speed limits and follow them your range will drop 'like a rock', but driving a Tesla fast is FUN. I've owned some seriously fast cars but a Tesla at speed is better than any other. If that is something you value, plan to stop to recharge MUCH more often. That's no different than it is with ICE, but...
    Trip Planner itself becomes entertaining for some of us. For me it is a joyful thing, maybe because of my flying habits. You'll soon figure out your preferences.

    Final note on Range Anxiety. IME, it disappears in about 5,000 miles or three months, whichever comes first.
     
    • Informative x 1
  14. green1

    green1 Active Member

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    Must be nice to live in the US. The superchargers in this country are spaced such that a 50% buffer would not be possible.
     
  15. JohnnyG

    JohnnyG Weee!

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2016
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    Location:
    Columbus, OH
    I don't know if anyone else has this data, or if the mods have a better place for it, but I am going to attach a spreadsheet I created with data that I scraped off of the Tesla servers, back in June of 2016...
    It contains every combination that Tesla had available on their servers at that time for range. Just use the Excel Filters to set the parameters you're curious about and have fun!

    http://www.filedropper.com/teslamsrange
     
    • Like x 1
  16. brec

    brec Member

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    Aug 3, 2015
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    Location:
    Reno & Las Vegas, NV
    I don't understand why payload is an input. I just did an experiment with evtripplanner.com. On a 2,200 mile trip across the western U.S. changing only the payload from 100 lb. to 400 lb. changed the energy consumption from 820.6 kWh to 821.0 kWh. That trip had a -4,400 ft. elevation change. For another 1,254 mi. trip, San Francisco to Denver, the net elevation change is +5,179 ft. and the energy consumption change with payload increasing from 100 to 400 lb. is from 476.4 to 477.6 kWh. Increasing payload to 800 lb. takes energy use up to 479.2 kWh -- 0.6% more than at 100 lb.
     
    • Like x 1
  17. MorrisonHiker

    MorrisonHiker S 100D 2020.44.15

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    I think that's why ABetterRoutePlanner (and maybe others?) leave it off. At ABetterRoutePlanner, you can adjust the "Consumption at 65 mph" value to account for wind, temperature, etc. but I guess you don't really know what value to put there until you are actually driving in that weather.
     
  18. John Stuckey

    John Stuckey Member

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    Oct 15, 2015
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    Location:
    Dayton, Ohio
    Before we did a RT from Dayton to ABQ we took a test trip to the closest SC outside of Dayton. We found the "percentage remaining at destination" number in the car to be very helpful. Play with it, speed up slow down. The only way to build your confidence is to figure out what works for you. Being nervous about range should be normal for ICE (desert, etc), large trailer hauling (can't fuel up just anywhere) and EVs.
     
  19. Mattzilla

    Mattzilla Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2016
    Messages:
    461
    Location:
    Allyn, WA
    I just finished driving around near Portland and the coast in 32-40 degree temps. The trip planner in car was off by about 3% SoC (it originally said I would reach my destination with 6%, but I arrived with 3%). It probably would have been off by more but I activated range mode and turned climate off about an hour before my destination. You can live with it by just planning for significantly more buffer than the planner says you need. Better to spend 5-10 more minutes at a supercharger than sit around for 2 hours waiting for a tow truck.
     
  20. Okemonkey

    Okemonkey Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2016
    Messages:
    28
    Location:
    East Bay, Rhode Island
    We have made our first longer range trips, RI to VT for skiing in two round trips in cold weather, and found EVtripplanner to be helpful and accurate both times. We used speed correction of 1.0 but drove speed limit to 10mph above. What were your driving speeds that you felt 1.2 was appropriate? I find this factor the most difficult to determine.
     

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