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Inaccurate Range Stressed New Owner

Spuzzz

Member
Apr 20, 2016
34
28
Columbus, OH
I think you have it backwards - setting '1' is close, setting '7' is far(ther). I started out a weekend road trip at '7' and felt like that was probably 7 car lengths. I ended up at '5' and found that more comfortable - less room for NJ drivers to cut in and out.... ;-) I will say that I love the TACC functionality. Still getting comfortable with Autosteer, especially when in traffic with cars or trucks that are weaving within their lane a bit....
I didn’t have it backwards. I meant the closest setting but I’m sure farther distances still yield a drag benefit. I read somewhere (but cannot confirm) that the ‘1’ setting would put you 1 second behind the lead car. So at higher speeds the distance would be greater. At 75mph you travel 110 feet in 1 second. Over 7 car lengths. I am comfortable with that distance but everyone is different. I would go longer but as you observed leaves so much room for people to jump in front of you.
 

DanDi58

Member
Jun 22, 2020
754
558
Dayton NJ
I didn’t have it backwards. I meant the closest setting but I’m sure farther distances still yield a drag benefit. I read somewhere (but cannot confirm) that the ‘1’ setting would put you 1 second behind the lead car. So at higher speeds the distance would be greater. At 75mph you travel 110 feet in 1 second. Over 7 car lengths. I am comfortable with that distance but everyone is different. I would go longer but as you observed leaves so much room for people to jump in front of you.
Well, here is the source, from the Owner's manual - To adjust the following distance you want to maintain between Model Y and a vehicle traveling ahead of you, press the steering wheel's right scroll button to the left or right to choose a setting from 1 (the closest following distance) to 7 (the longest following distance). Each setting corresponds to a time-based distance that represents how long it takes for Model Y, from its current location, to reach the location of the rear bumper of the vehicle ahead of you. So it does seem like the distance is not a set distance but based on your speed setting.
 
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gigawatt1010

Member
Aug 21, 2016
492
481
Orange County, New York
So here we have another multi-page thread started by someone who obviously didn't do much research or reading before buying a MY in terms of understanding range - and who hasn't even had the courtesy to come back on and engage after dropping a complaint as their first post. :mad:
I was thinking the same, I went through all the pages looking for his response. He probably sold the Y now. Feel bad about people having poor first impressions with EVs. I think it's a crappy situation all together, for the uninformed owner, for Tesla and for EVs in general. Also, people don't realize (or conveniently forget) that gas cars are also subject to poor mileage rating based on how heavy your right foot is and if you're using AC, etc.

When I had my e38 BMW (and most bimmers of that era) they had a gauge for mileage under the tach and every time you stomp on the gas pedal aggressively, you see it go to 8mpg. LOL People never went to forums and said, my car did not get the 24mpg that it advertises.

Moral of the story, especially in this day and age of the interwebs, you should inform yourself as much as possible. There's just no excuse why one is uninformed these days,
 

mark95476

Active Member
Jun 21, 2020
1,007
544
Bay Area CA
I think it's a big presumption that this poster actually had a MY in the first place.

Tesla had record deliveries last quarter. The usual anti-Tesla FUD isn't working.

I was thinking the same, I went through all the pages looking for his response. He probably sold the Y now. Feel bad about people having poor first impressions with EVs. I think it's a crappy situation all together, for the uninformed owner, for Tesla and for EVs in general. Also, people don't realize (or conveniently forget) that gas cars are also subject to poor mileage rating based on how heavy your right foot is and if you're using AC, etc.

When I had my e38 BMW (and most bimmers of that era) they had a gauge for mileage under the tach and every time you stomp on the gas pedal aggressively, you see it go to 8mpg. LOL People never went to forums and said, my car did not get the 24mpg that it advertises.

Moral of the story, especially in this day and age of the interwebs, you should inform yourself as much as possible. There's just no excuse why one is uninformed these days,
 

zecar

Member
Nov 30, 2017
392
256
Chicago
Jazzax, this is why I drive our MY at 70mph on the highway when road-tripping. I know some folks like to move along at 80mph or so and stop at every Supercharger location for a "quickie." I tend to charge up the car a bit more and go for some distance that way.

Rich

I keep track of my stops and charging. See the PDF attached. And, yeah, I fill the car up maybe a bit too often!
What are you charging at 40-50% (if I read your sheet correctly)? The car charges much faster at a lower SOC.
 
Oct 31, 2019
243
308
Georgia
This is the way. Owners need to think about how batteries work and how to make your Tesla work for you.

How to travel in a Tesla (or getting from point A to point B as fast as possible):
1) Drive as fast as possible.
2) Ride the charge curve up to ~60% or until the charge rate throttles significantly.
You need to arrive with a low state of charge and relatively hot battery so abide by (1). Floor it before you arrive at the SC so your battery is ready.
3) Stop frequently so you can get more of (1) and (2).
Aim for big numbers--avg speed and charge rate.

This.

We just did a trip from Atlanta, GA to Orlando, FL in a Model 3 LR AWD.

There was another Model 3 LR AWD traveling the same stops as we were, and while they were first to leave the first supercharger stop, they were trailing behind leaving the 2nd stop and we were almost ready to leave as they were pulling into the third stop.

The other driver asked how I was able to drive faster than them and charge quicker at the same time. First question I asked was, “What state of charge are you arriving at?” His answer was 30-35% and he is charging to 70-80%.

I’ve been arriving with 10-15% and charging only to 60-65% with exception of the third stop where I charged to 75%.

Quickest way to road trip a Tesla is drive as fast as you can, arrive with low SoC and leave with a 5-8% SoC buffer than what the on-board trip planner says. In temperatures below 40 degrees F, make that buffer 10-15%.
 

jacksonlui

Member
Oct 15, 2020
31
16
san diego
I'm new to EV and I'm also concerned with the range, I guess you guys call this range anxiety.
  • Is 10% buffer really enough? What if the last section is an uphill? Wouldn't you risk running out of juice?
  • If you try to ride the curve between 10%-60%, which means frequent stops wouldn't you have to add in the time it takes to get off the hwy and the risk of having to wait on line for an available charger?
  • I'm more concerned with my range on long trips in the mountains where SC's are far and few in between (i.e. Yosemite)\
  • I'v been playing with ABRP but seems kind of clunky. Is there a better option? I like the granularity it gives and seems like historical energy consumption plays a huge factor. I don't even know what to put since I don't have any experience. Does ABRP allow on the fly changes to energy consumption estimates without having to go into settings and recreating the trip?
  • I'm trying to goto Yosemite but ABRP's route puts me at 10% SOC at arrival and there's no SC at the destination and I don't want to deal with slow chargers and having to find one. The only other way is to add a waypoint to the nearest city (Merced) and charge fully from there which gets me to 65% SOC which is enough to not have to worry about my battery and still mope around the park for a few days. This adds about an hour to the overall trip. So if I think about it... I save $75 on gas but spend 1hr more to charge in a trip which should only take 7hrs. Not so sure it's worth it.
Anyways, playing devil's advocate but I intend to be fully vested in this EV for now. Just a learning curve.. Something which prospective buyers should've been educated in.
 

iansherwood74

Member
Jan 22, 2021
13
6
Winter Garden, Florida
Yeah it’s your speed. I live in FL where it’s flat, and doing 75MPH on the highway I see about 350 Wh/ml which means you’re really looking at a 100% charged range of about 230 miles on the 80KW battery of an LR. I use worst case scenario planning of 2 miles per percentile of battery. If my trip can’t do that with a buffer I plan on hitting a supercharger. If you want to drive anyway you like and not think about it, use that rule with a buffer that makes you comfortable on top of it. I never plan to reach a SC with less than 10% battery while running at my 2 miles per percent rule. That’s very conservative and should cover all bases.
 

theschnell

Member
Oct 27, 2014
845
3,159
Calhoun, GA
It’s interesting to see that the OP let range anxiety ruin their trip when they said they had over 100 miles of range left and the supercharger was 60 miles away. The best answer would have been to just do the safari, then drive to the supercharger (slower if necessary), charge up and go home. Going to a slow charger 30 minutes away was a complete waste of time and energy. But these are things you learn through either research or experience.
 

Mrbrock

Member
Mar 26, 2020
685
368
Napa, CA
For all EV range tools they have you arrive at low SOC so you have the fastest charging possible or expecting you to slow charge overnight. For ABRP, click the gear next to your destination and enter your desired arrival SOC. If available it will add an extra stop to give you your desired result.

@jacksonlui
 
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jacksonlui

Member
Oct 15, 2020
31
16
san diego
From all this reading and learning from others, it seems like for a new owner, it's best to just look at battery percentage then for each leg, plan 15% SOC arrival and charge up to 65%. That seems to give the fastest travel times. However, ABRP has a few legs where I only SC for 6 minutes. I'm thinking it'll take 15 min overhead just to get on/off the highway. I don't think ABRP takes this into account , not sure charging for 6 minutes makes sense. Is there a way in ABRP to skip one SC leg or remove a stop easily other than black listing a station?

In a few months, I plan to drive 8 hrs starting at midnight (so cal to Yosemite). It'll be an interesting drive through the mountains. This will be my first real test, hence all the questions. The last thing I want to say to the wife is "Honey, time to wake up, I need you to, umm, help me push the car" :)
 
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MorrisonHiker

S 100D 2021.4.15
Mar 8, 2015
9,565
8,745
Colorado
From all this reading and learning from others, it seems like for a new owner, it's best to just look at battery percentage then for each leg, plan 15% SOC arrival and charge up to 65%. That seems to give the fastest travel times. However, ABRP has a few legs where I only SC for 6 minutes. I'm thinking it'll take 15 min overhead just to get on/off the highway. I don't think ABRP takes this into account , not sure charging for 6 minutes makes sense. Is there a way in ABRP to skip one SC leg or remove a stop easily other than black listing a station?

In a few months, I plan to drive 8 hrs starting at midnight (so cal to Yosemite). It'll be an interesting drive through the mountains. This will be my first real test, hence all the questions. The last thing I want to say to the wife is "Honey, time to wake up, I need you to, umm, help me push the car" :)
ABRP has an option where you can specify the Charging overhead:

1619810086889.png


If you want to skip a Supercharger, just click Actions and Avoid this charger. Alternatively, you can tell it to charge longer at an earlier Supercharger and then it could automatically skip it.
 

KenC

Active Member
Sep 4, 2018
3,475
3,160
Maine
You absolutely should use ABRP as a planning tool, so you don't find your family trip ruined.

Punching in Aldine, Houston, TX, to Aggieland Safari, 113mi away, if the OP drives 65mph, he can get there and back with 10% to spare. However, it's doubtful in Texas, he'd want to drive so slowly. If he drives 75mph, like he said, then ABRP says, he needs to stop in Huntsville, where he did, to charge for 5+ mins. That only adds 7miles to his total trip. Interestingly, even with the side trip to the Huntsville SC, it's actually 8 mins faster.

The point is, there'd be no range anxiety, if the OP had just planned on driving fast, using as much energy as he likes and stopping at Huntsville to begin with. By not planning ahead, he found himself at a slow Level 2 charger wasting an hour and a half.

Running trip simulations in ABRP will teach you what are efficient road trip strategies. Texas seems to need more SC stops, but having said that, in general, the fastest trips are ones where you drive fast, and charge often at low SOC, about 15%, and charge up to about 65%. Rinse and Repeat.

I've said it before, but Tesla should just buy ABRP's trip planner, clean it the interface to make it easier to use, and incorporate it, since it uses real-World data. Far more accurate if you give it good data, and lots of the data, it just pulls from your car, like ambient temp, SOC, calibrated efficiency, deg, etc.
 

Mrbrock

Member
Mar 26, 2020
685
368
Napa, CA
From all this reading and learning from others, it seems like for a new owner, it's best to just look at battery percentage then for each leg, plan 15% SOC arrival and charge up to 65%. That seems to give the fastest travel times. However, ABRP has a few legs where I only SC for 6 minutes. I'm thinking it'll take 15 min overhead just to get on/off the highway. I don't think ABRP takes this into account , not sure charging for 6 minutes makes sense. Is there a way in ABRP to skip one SC leg or remove a stop easily other than black listing a station?

In a few months, I plan to drive 8 hrs starting at midnight (so cal to Yosemite). It'll be an interesting drive through the mountains. This will be my first real test, hence all the questions. The last thing I want to say to the wife is "Honey, time to wake up, I need you to, umm, help me push the car" :)
So you don’t think when it plans for point to point travel it accounts for all the roads between the highway and the actual charger? That it literally only calculates time along interstates or highways? If by overhead you mean parking, getting out of the car and plugging in then that is what the charging overhead setting is for. The 6 minutes you see is the time from plug in to unplug. The on/off ramp travel is accounted for in the main legs between chargers.
 
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