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Model 3 - 175 miles from a 277 mile charge?

DJKappeler

Member
Oct 29, 2019
15
38
Herndon, VA
My dual motor performance Model 3 is supposed to have a 325 mile range (+/-). When I charge to 80% it registers about about 277 miles when charging stops. I've driven the car in the summer. I've driven the car in the winter. I've driven city and I've taken road trips. Regardless of the temp outside OR the type of driving I do, I don't get ANYWHERE NEAR the advertised miles (like, not even close). Did Tesla find a 325 mile downhill slope somewhere to test mileage? I've owned the car just under a year and have put about 10,000 miles on it. Anyone else have this issue?
 

Nogasmn

Member
Dec 8, 2018
232
126
Rochester
You also have to take into consideration your HVAC settings especially in winter, running the heater sucks up energy. Since you have a performance maybe slow it down, the 310 mile range was calculated at 55 mph.
 

jmaddr

Active Member
Mar 29, 2019
1,021
1,036
Florida
The 310 mile range is based on a ~230W/mi calculation and based on the LR AWD. The P is just a LR AWD with bigger energy sapping tires. The EPA did not re-certify the range for the P just because of the tires and extra amperage (the motor is the same). At a more realistic best case 250W/mi, that's a 285mile range (assuming a 71.3kWh). Then, that's from 0-100% at a low speed with lab based wind and incline (read none).

Check your average for the past 30 miles in the energy app on your screen. It's not unusual to average over 300W/mi with incline, cold, wind, AC/heat, etc. At 300W/mi that's a 0-100% range of 237miles. Again, this is calculated at 71300Whr/(310W/mi). Using that same app and using the trip tab, you can watch how your P fares based on current conditions. There will be two lines...one for rated (again at a LR AWD and not a P) and one for your average over the past X miles. I think you will see that if you get your line below the rated (meaning better) than you will achieve near the 310 miles range.
 

DirtyT3sla

Member
Apr 17, 2019
570
640
Holly
The rated range is 310 which is confirmed and allowed by EPA testing. Tesla cannot just make up whatever number they want.

To achieve that range, you need to get somewhere around 240wh/mi. Check your trip stats by swiping to the left on the bottom left of the screen. If your energy use is more than 240wh/mi, you will get less range.

If your 3P has the 20" tires, you are using more energy than if you had 18" tires (especially with aero cap). If you accelerate hard, you will use more energy. EPA testing is somewhere around 65mph I believe (don't quote me) so if you go faster than that, you will get less range.

All of this is the same in a gas car...but people don't seem to care so much. Did any of your gas cars get EPA estimated range? Most people don't even know.

If you want to get more range, get smaller wheels, accelerate slower, and keep a lower top speed. Speed is the #1 range indicator. Other than that you can fiddle with HVAC, but I'd rather be comfortable than stressing over a few more miles.
 

joebruin77

Active Member
Dec 23, 2018
1,149
1,033
Encino, CA
I have the same trim and I do find that if I drive conservatively and efficiently, I am able to achieve the 310 rated range. Here are some specific things to consider that have helped me:

1) I over-inflate my tires about 2 psi above the recommended level as indicated on the sticker inside the driver's side door. So instead of 42 psi, I keep my tires at 44 or 45 cold psi. This helps quite a bit.

2) I had Xpel Prime Plus ceramic tint installed on all windows. This is like adding insulation to your house. It significantly reduces the amount of energy needed to cool the car and keep it cool.

3) I got the Stats For Tesla app. For $19.99 this is a great investment. It shows data from your Tesla including the health of your battery and how efficiently you are driving. I recommend it as a way to keep tabs on how well your Tesla is doing in its energy consumption.

4) I noticed that if I go for very short drives (less than 3 miles) my efficiency rating goes down. If I go for longer drives, my efficiency goes up.

Hope that helps.
 

DJKappeler

Member
Oct 29, 2019
15
38
Herndon, VA
310. 325. Max mileage wasn't the main point. Getting 175 miles from a 275 mile charge is my concern. My 50 mile round-trip commute to work, in the spring and fall (when not using heat or A/C) doesn't improve the mileage substantially. I bought the car in Feb and Tesla told me to expect a sizable degradation in mileage due to the cold (the physics of batteries). Not much improvement was realized when it warmed up this past summer, however. It is almost exactly 200 miles to our place on the shore and I can't get 3/4ths the way there on a FULL charge (which, with the update, has been well over 310 miles).
 
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DJKappeler

Member
Oct 29, 2019
15
38
Herndon, VA
I have the same trim and I do find that if I drive conservatively and efficiently, I am able to achieve the 310 rated range. Here are some specific things to consider that have helped me:

1) I over-inflate my tires about 2 psi above the recommended level as indicated on the sticker inside the driver's side door. So instead of 42 psi, I keep my tires at 44 or 45 cold psi. This helps quite a bit.

2) I had Xpel Prime Plus ceramic tint installed on all windows. This is like adding insulation to your house. It significantly reduces the amount of energy needed to cool the car and keep it cool.

3) I got the Stats For Tesla app. For $19.99 this is a great investment. It shows data from your Tesla including the health of your battery and how efficiently you are driving. I recommend it as a way to keep tabs on how well your Tesla is doing in its energy consumption.

4) I noticed that if I go for very short drives (less than 3 miles) my efficiency rating goes down. If I go for longer drives, my efficiency goes up.

Hope that helps.

Thanks for the input!
 

derotam

Member
Oct 31, 2018
864
810
Oak Hill, VA
310. 325. Max mileage wasn't the main point. Getting 175 miles from a 275 mile charge is my concern. My 50 mile round-trip commute to work, in the spring and fall (when not using heat or A/C) doesn't improve the mileage substantially. I bought the car in Feb and Tesla told me to expect a sizable degradation in mileage due to the cold (the physics of batteries). Not much improvement was realized when it warmed up this past summer, however. It is almost exactly 200 miles to our place on the shore and I can't get 3/4ths the way there on a FULL charge (which, with the update, has been well over 310 miles).

It hasn't been explicitly asked but I will ask... when you go to the shore, or even just in general, what is you Wh/mile average on your trip meter?

This will give us a better idea on how to respond. Generally all of these statements like yours can be explained, but we need more info.
 

mreynolds767

Member
Jul 11, 2019
728
403
Boston
As well as your 325 / 310 being off ; the 80% showing 277 cannot be accurate either.
If you see 277 after charging I suspect you have charging set to 90% not 80%

I do think for the performance Telsa should list it a little lower than the 310 rating the EPA gives (same for AWD and AWD Performance) the tire and rim difference alone means they should more accurately list it at 290 or at max 300 for buyers to understand this better.

As mentioned by others you need to achieve 230 wh/mile to get the rated miles. Right on your screen it shows you what you are getting since last time car was in park, since last charge, since lifetime, etc... so you can compare what you are actually getting.
Like you I do not average 230 wh/mile.
I average 260 and that is with an AWD (non performance) and with 18" wheels (aero covers off)
If I had a performance on the 20's I am sure that would be closer to 275

The biggest factor is high speed. Above 70 the car is not efficient. Above 75 it gets even worse. Based on one chart I saw, the car loses about 20 miles of range per 5 miles an hour above 65. So drive 70 instead of 65 you are going to get close to 20 miles less. 75 instead of 65, 40 miles less. 80 instead of 65, 60 miles less. To me that is a huge difference between say a V6 ICE car where cruising at 75 is very efficient. An electric car it is much more efficient to sit in stop and go traffic on the highway than cruise along with no traffic at 70+

EPA testing is likely not going over 65 for any length of time so makes sense how the car can be rated at 230 wh/mile and a 310 range.

If you slow your highway speed to 65 max you will notice a big efficient boost with a Model 3
While I am aware of this, I am still not ready to routinely drive that slow. I do on average drive slower top speeds on the highway than I used to though.
 
Last edited:

PACEMD

Active Member
Aug 8, 2019
1,108
1,706
Billings, MT, USA
It all depends on how you drive. Herndon to the Eastern Shore, Outer Banks, or where ever is not exactly smooth sailing. I routinely commute 150 miles on the interstate with my P3D-. As noted above speed is the big energy user. Same with an ICE machine, we just don't care. With a full charge of 310 miles, my 150-mile trip uses from 150 miles to 250 miles, dependent mostly on me. At 65 mph and above freezing I get the full range. At 85 mph, not even close. If I drop down to 55 mph I get over the rated range, but I ain't got the patience for such an adventure. I advise learning how to drive efficiently so when you need the extra miles. Other than that, forget it, just like we all do with ICE vehicles.
 

jjrandorin

Moderator, Model 3, Tesla Energy Forums
Nov 28, 2018
10,839
12,567
Riverside Co. CA
Anyone else have this issue?

Other than the fact that you cant be charging to what you said (80%) with the range that you show (277) and you have the total range incorrect, as mentioned your total range will depend on many factors, such as speed driven, elevation, etc etc.

As to the "anyone else have this issue" part, many new posters tend to post that, but I can never really tell if they really want to know or not. My thought is, if they really wanted to know "if anyone else has this issue" they would have searched the site others having the same issue.

On the off chance that you DO want to read threads where others are complaining of this issue (along with some very smart people posting detailed explanations as to why this might be, here are some threads on the topic).


My model 3 says full at 210 miles
V10 and Battery "Degradation"
Battery Degradation Scientifically Explained
Range drop
Suspicious range numbers
90 percent charge low?
100% charged with 204 miles. Lemon law applies?
100% charge range of SR+ at 224...new order of same car is 250 advertised
Service appointment for 12 month old Model 3 for range loss /invoice for out of warranty inspection?
2.2% battery degradation at 11k miles
Battery Degradation and Rated Range explained
Almost 15% range loss Model 3 Awd
Poll: LR battery degradation @ 3k miles
Model 3 Performance Battery Degradation One Month (Story)
I love this car, but.....
Battery degradation or BMS error?
Tesla appointment for battery health concerns mysteriously disappeared
Do batteries contain a “buffer”? My kW usage doesn’t match pack size
Mid-range changes in range or battery degradation
Range on midrange reduced to 219 miles
Model 3 Long Range Rated Mileage at 310 or 325?
TeslaFi - Battery Degradation Reports (upload your data)
Wh/mile specifically for M3 LR AWD with 19" wheels
Standard actual battery range or defective battery?
 
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jjrandorin

Moderator, Model 3, Tesla Energy Forums
Nov 28, 2018
10,839
12,567
Riverside Co. CA
310. 325. Max mileage wasn't the main point. Getting 175 miles from a 275 mile charge is my concern. My 50 mile round-trip commute to work, in the spring and fall (when not using heat or A/C) doesn't improve the mileage substantially. I bought the car in Feb and Tesla told me to expect a sizable degradation in mileage due to the cold (the physics of batteries). Not much improvement was realized when it warmed up this past summer, however. It is almost exactly 200 miles to our place on the shore and I can't get 3/4ths the way there on a FULL charge (which, with the update, has been well over 310 miles).

If a "full charge" is "well over 310 miles" you do not have a "model 3 performance" . If you do, you have the only one in the world that ever charged over 310.
 
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joebruin77

Active Member
Dec 23, 2018
1,149
1,033
Encino, CA
3) I got the Stats For Tesla app. For $19.99 this is a great investment. It shows data from your Tesla including the health of your battery and how efficiently you are driving. I recommend it as a way to keep tabs on how well your Tesla is doing in its energy consumption.

Just so you can see what I am referring to re the Stats For Tesla app, this is the graph that gives you a good sense of your battery's health and rate of degradation over time:

IMG_1714.PNG
 

Qbenjamin

Frugal But Classy!
Jan 7, 2017
1,158
738
Bravos
My M3LR was definitely the most efficient of the Tesla trio that I've owned. At highway speeds (70+), the efficiency loss was around 10%-12%. Try the same speeds in the X and its closer to a 30%-40% loss (22" wheels/P model/sport mode). If you expect 1 mile to actually be 1 mile of range used, that's probably not going to happen unless you're in a test environment.
 

Nocturnal

Supporting Member
Supporting Member
Aug 23, 2018
6,744
37,102
Deepening Crisis!
Do you watch your energy graph? On a nice day at 65/70 I can hit rated efficiency. That's rare though as weather, acceleration, etc. all reduce range. I've seen my range drop as much as 40% driving in temps close to zero, highway speeds, in the wind, heater blasting etc.
 

toolman335

Member
Oct 3, 2019
857
696
Rochester
I find this thread to be both very informative and dumbed down enough for a new owner like me to understand. It makes sense why my range was getting killed over the weekend when I was driving 75 mph for a few hours. I kept thinking it was the heat/defrost so I was playing with those settings quite a bit.
Dumb question: I don't like the look of the Aero wheel covers so I took them off. How much would that impact the range? I know it depends on what kind of driving and MPH the car goes, but I'm curious if anyone can put a figure on it. I haven't seen this information anywhere.
 

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